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Tuff Gong
07-26-2006, 04:36 PM
Patterson starts new consultancy
published: Wednesday | July 26, 2006

http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20060726/business/images/GLmTE1135_1_P53O3OPMD20AM.jpg
Patterson

Former Prime Minister P J Patterson has launched an international consulting firm and has set up shop on the 10th floor of the Life of Jamaica Centre in New Kingston.

Patterson was not available for comment yesterday, but an announce-ment of the venture sent to a select group named the outfit as HeisConsults and said that it was an regional and international consulting firm.

A lawyer by training, Patterson served as Prime Minister for 14 years until he retired in March. Prior to being Prime Minister, Patterson held several ministerial posts, including that of foreign minister and is acknowledged to have wide international contacts, especially in the developing world.

Shortly after he retired, it was announced that Patterson would join the consulting firm of Goodworks International, in which former US Ambassador to the UN and one-time mayor of Atlanta, Andrew Young, is a principal.

It was not clear whether that arrangement remains intact and what, if any, relationship exists between Goodworks and HeisConsults.

This will be Patterson's second stint at international consultancy. After he lost his parliamentary seat in the 1980 general election, Patterson became a partner in a then new law firm Rattray, Patterson and Rattray and help form a separate consulting company.

Patterson starts new consultancy (http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20060726/business/business2.html)

wolmersboy
07-26-2006, 05:43 PM
/forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif

Tuff Gong
07-27-2006, 01:35 AM
ello is dis Heist Consultin?

Yes maam, you have reached The Heist.
I am The Most Honourable PJoke Batterson, former Prime Minister of Jamaica and a Consultant to the GOJ. I operate as a front for BadWorks International, I Chair the Contracts Award and Monitoring Committee of the same.

Sometime ago, a contract was negotiated between the GOJ and a foreign firm by my Committee. This contract was over invoiced to the tune of US$21.5M. This was done deliberately. The over- invoicing was a deal by my committee to benefit from the project. The money is being held in a Suspense Account, which with GOJ permission can be transferred into any Overseas Account. We hope you will be able to provide such an account for us..

SHARE: -

For providing the account where we shall remit the money into, you will be entitled to 30% of the money, 60% will be for me and my partners while 10% has been mapped out from the total sum to cover any expenses that may be incurred by us during the course of this transfer, both locally and international expenses. It may interest you to know that a similar transaction was carried out with one MR. G.O.D., President of JaneTech Intl. The deal was concluded and all covering documents were forwarded to A. Young to authenticate the claim. Once the funds were transferred, MR. A. Young presented his Bank with all the legal documents and remitted the whole funds to another Bank Account and disappeared completely. My colleagues were shattered, as such opportunities do not come all the time. I would require the following: -

1. Your Company's Name, Address, Tel. & Fax. Numbers.

2. Your Bank Account Number and Address where the
money will be remitted.

Wah yu seh sah, dat soun really good!

I assure you maam, you are in for a pretty good windfall.

Tuff Gong
07-30-2006, 04:57 AM
One day I am going to apply for a job as a prophet.

[ QUOTE ]
Mullings wants int'l audit of Jamaica-Nigeria oil transactions

By balford henry Sunday Observer writer
Monday, July 31, 2006

Clive Mullings, the Opposition spokesman on mining, energy and telecommunications, wants the government to retain an international oil consultant to audit all Jamaica-Nigeria oil trading transactions since 1999 when the services of US firm GoodWorks International was acquired.


"The country must know what role does GoodWorks plays in these transactions and what it has cost to date," Mullings insisted, as he made his sectoral debate presentation at Gordon House on Wednesday night.


GoodWorks International is an Atlanta, Georgia-based consulting firm which has retained the services of former Prime Minister PJ Patterson since his retirement.


An allegation by the leader of the opposition, Bruce Golding, that it was involved in the sale of the Jamaica Public Service Company (JPS) to Mirant has been denied by GoodWorks. Mirant bought a 90 per cent stake in JPS during Patterson's tenure as prime minister.


Mullings told the House that prior to 1999, the oil arrangement between Jamaica and Nigeria was handled by a joint venture between the Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica (PCJ) and international oil trading company Vitol SA Inc.


"This joint venture partnership allowed PCJ to share 50/50 in the profits," Mullings said. "PCJ was indemnified against losses and the partnership was audited frequently by an international oil consultant.


"We are advised in a letter to Mr Audley Shaw (the Opposition spokesman on finance and the public service), under the signature of the permanent secretary, that 'The absence of a Jamaican high commissioner in Abuja, Nigeria during 1999 was one of the reasons that led PCJ to acquire the services of GoodWorks International, an Atlanta-based firm, to assist in the process of acquiring new liftings of Nigerian oil'."


Mullings said he wanted to know what qualifications GoodWorks had in the oil industry that could have prompted their involvement in the government-to-government negotiations.


He said that a three-way arrangement now exists between PCJ, GoodWorks and a new oil trader, Trafigura Limited, and questioned why those arrangements were not being audited.


Added Mullings :"One wonders whether this was the reason why the Ministry of Finance and Planning instructed the PCJ that, with effect from April 1, 2005 the net income from the Nigerian oil facility was to be paid into the consolidated fund?"

[/ QUOTE ]
Mullings wants int'l audit of Jamaica-Nigeria oil transactions (http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/news/html/20060730T000000-0500_110117_OBS_MULLINGS_WANTS_INT_L_AUDIT_OF_JAMA ICA_NIGERIA_OIL_TRANSACTIONS.asp)

Tuff Gong
09-13-2006, 12:51 AM
http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/editorial/images/20060912T010000-0500_112803_OBS_EDITORIAL_CARTOON_1.jpg

Wahalla
09-13-2006, 07:39 AM
[ QUOTE ]
One day I am going to apply for a job as a prophet.

[ QUOTE ]
Mullings wants int'l audit of Jamaica-Nigeria oil transactions

By balford henry Sunday Observer writer
Monday, July 31, 2006

Clive Mullings, the Opposition spokesman on mining, energy and telecommunications, wants the government to retain an international oil consultant to audit all Jamaica-Nigeria oil trading transactions since 1999 when the services of US firm GoodWorks International was acquired.


"The country must know what role does GoodWorks plays in these transactions and what it has cost to date," Mullings insisted, as he made his sectoral debate presentation at Gordon House on Wednesday night.


GoodWorks International is an Atlanta, Georgia-based consulting firm which has retained the services of former Prime Minister PJ Patterson since his retirement.


An allegation by the leader of the opposition, Bruce Golding, that it was involved in the sale of the Jamaica Public Service Company (JPS) to Mirant has been denied by GoodWorks. Mirant bought a 90 per cent stake in JPS during Patterson's tenure as prime minister.


Mullings told the House that prior to 1999, the oil arrangement between Jamaica and Nigeria was handled by a joint venture between the Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica (PCJ) and international oil trading company Vitol SA Inc.


"This joint venture partnership allowed PCJ to share 50/50 in the profits," Mullings said. "PCJ was indemnified against losses and the partnership was audited frequently by an international oil consultant.


"We are advised in a letter to Mr Audley Shaw (the Opposition spokesman on finance and the public service), under the signature of the permanent secretary, that 'The absence of a Jamaican high commissioner in Abuja, Nigeria during 1999 was one of the reasons that led PCJ to acquire the services of GoodWorks International, an Atlanta-based firm, to assist in the process of acquiring new liftings of Nigerian oil'."


Mullings said he wanted to know what qualifications GoodWorks had in the oil industry that could have prompted their involvement in the government-to-government negotiations.


He said that a three-way arrangement now exists between PCJ, GoodWorks and a new oil trader, Trafigura Limited, and questioned why those arrangements were not being audited.


Added Mullings :"One wonders whether this was the reason why the Ministry of Finance and Planning instructed the PCJ that, with effect from April 1, 2005 the net income from the Nigerian oil facility was to be paid into the consolidated fund?"

[/ QUOTE ]
Mullings wants int'l audit of Jamaica-Nigeria oil transactions (http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/news/html/20060730T000000-0500_110117_OBS_MULLINGS_WANTS_INT_L_AUDIT_OF_JAMA ICA_NIGERIA_OIL_TRANSACTIONS.asp)

[/ QUOTE ]


This is actually required but sorry tuffy.. no chance!

Dr.Dudd
09-13-2006, 12:16 PM
The opposition that desperate for traction??
yoyu want to tell me that if goodwill even was involved in the favourable oil agreement thatjamaica got,it would affact the former PM consulting for them. alth0ugh he stated that he would not be doing work involving Jamaica??
which common allage school graduate would not realize that the books of Petrojam is audited on an annual basis,and as a person who uaditing that as my first foray in the work place.
nothing can be exempted in an audit. There is a thing they call an 'audit trail'every team have to check out.
This is the hights of fishing. the problemis that if theyu don't find noithing they won't talk about the wasted funds in the audit,but they hash every enquiry done by that does not finmd wrong to be a waste.

Tuff Gong
09-14-2006, 06:58 PM
[ QUOTE ]
The opposition that desperate for traction??
yoyu want to tell me that if goodwill even was involved in the favourable oil agreement thatjamaica got,it would affact the former PM consulting for them. alth0ugh he stated that he would not be doing work involving Jamaica??
which common allage school graduate would not realize that the books of Petrojam is audited on an annual basis,and as a person who uaditing that as my first foray in the work place.
nothing can be exempted in an audit. There is a thing they call an 'audit trail'every team have to check out.
This is the hights of fishing. the problemis that if theyu don't find noithing they won't talk about the wasted funds in the audit,but they hash every enquiry done by that does not finmd wrong to be a waste.

[/ QUOTE ]

What are you saying?

Tuff Gong
10-07-2006, 03:55 AM
Trafigura says $31 million a commercial agreement - report

Saturday, October 07, 2006

<font color="brown">THE controversy surrounding the $31-million donation to the governing People's National Party took on a new twist yesterday, with oil trader Trafigura saying the money was part of a commercial agreement, according to a report carried by CVM TV.

CVM TV, in its newscast last night, reported that Trafigura, in responding to questions sent to its London-based office, said that as part of its development of its business in Jamaica it has a commercial agreement with CCOC Association and payments were made under that agreement.</font>

<font color="blue">"Trafigura conducts its business in accordance with the OECD Convention on Combating bribery of Foreign Public Officials and observes the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises," Trafigura told the Jamaican television station.</font>
<font color="red">On Wednesday, People's National Party (PNP) general secretary Colin Campbell said that CCOC Associates was a fundraising account not a company. He said, too, that the letters in the name CCOC meant nothing.</font>

<font color="blue">However on Thursday, Norton Hinds, whose signature appears on the account, told the Observer that CCOC was established in 1992 by persons interested in having Campbell elected to Parliament and that CCOC stood for "Colin Campbell Our Candidate".</font>
<font color="red">Campbell, in response to the Trafigura statement, said it had contacted the oil trader and asked them to clarify the term "commercial agreement", said CVM.

The PNP general secretary maintained that the transaction was a contribution and that the CCOC would not do any business with Trafigura since it was only a fundraising account.</font>

http://www.jamaicans.com/forums/newreply...part=1&amp;vc=1 (http://www.jamaicans.com/forums/newreply.php?Cat=0&amp;Board=11&amp;Number=19672585&amp;page=0 &amp;what=showflat&amp;fpart=1&amp;vc=1)


Bank sends top exec on leave
Negotiating with PNP on Trafigura leak

Saturday, October 07, 2006

FIRSTCARIBBEAN International Bank (FCIB) yesterday sent Sonia Christie, a senior executive, on three days leave,
pending investigations into how confidential information about a PNP account was leaked to the Opposition JLP.

At the same time, the bank began negotiations with the People's National Party (PNP), hoping to head off a lawsuit that the party warned it would pursue on grounds that FCIB had breached confidentiality rules.

The PNP was also pushing for criminal charges to be laid against the bank staffer who allegedly leaked the information to the Jamaica Labour Party (JLP), that it had received $31 million from Dutch oil trader, Trafigura.

Bank spokespersons were tightlipped about both developments but Colin Campbell, the PNP general-secretary last night confirmed that the discussions, under which the party was seeking compensation in exchange for not going to court, had been held and that no settlement was reached, although the talks were fruitful.

"The talks will continue on Monday, at which time we hope to reach an agreement," Campbell said, adding that a public statement on the matter was being worked on between both parties.
In the meantime, Observer sources said, Christie, wife of the deputy mayor of Falmouth, Fitz Christie, had been sent on three-days leave by FCIB, while the investigations were underway.

But the source said it was not clear whether Christie was being blamed for the leak or whether she was being held accountable as head of the section from which the leak came.
The FCIB executive has extensive experience in international banking and acts as a sort of watchdog for the bank in matters such as money laundering and risk management.

"She is highly regarded for her work and was the person called upon to hold money laundering seminars for the staff," the source said.
Christie is said to be an activist for the JLP and is credited with helping Pearnel Charles to win his Clarendon seat in the 2002 general elections. The source said she is also related to Lorna Golding, wife of Opposition Leader Bruce Golding.

Golding set the cat among the pigeons Tuesday when he revealed that the PNP had financed its September annual conference with $31 million received from Trafigura, which sells Nigerian crude for Jamaica.

The PNP maintains that it has done nothing illegal and the money was a legitimate gift from Trafigura.
But human rights watchdog, Jamaicans for Justice (JFJ), yesterday raised several questions about the deposit of millions of dollars to an account called CCOC.

JFJ wanted to know what the terms and conditions of the Trafigura contract are; how it was awarded; why no external audits had been done over the last five years; how much money Trafigura made on the contract vis a vis how much money Jamaica made; and why the contract was renewed annually and without tender for the last five years?

"Based on the figures in the public domain, Trafigura's deposit to CCOC Association was for a sum which was more than twice what Jamaica earned from the contract in the lift year to April 2006. Why was such a disproportionately large sum deposited in this obscure account at a time when the Trafigura contract was up for renewal?
".Should we be concerned that senior leaders of government appear unaware of the distinction between ethically wrong and illegal conduct? Are they blind to the questionable ethical appearance of this deposit and the way it was handled?"

Jamaicans for Justice said the discussions around the revelations also highlighted a number of related issues which must be dealt with separately. Among these, it said, was the need for "Whistleblower legislation" to protect those who act in the public interest, but who in doing so, may be in breach of rules against disclosure whether in the private or public sector.

(Paul Henry contributed to this story)

http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/news/html...C_ON_LEAVE_.asp (http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/news/html/20061006T220000-0500_113733_OBS_BANK_SENDS_TOP_EXEC_ON_LEAVE_.asp)

Dyoll_73
10-07-2006, 03:50 PM
[ QUOTE ]
The opposition that desperate for traction??
yoyu want to tell me that if goodwill even was involved in the favourable oil agreement thatjamaica got,it would affact the former PM consulting for them. alth0ugh he stated that he would not be doing work involving Jamaica??
which common allage school graduate would not realize that the books of Petrojam is audited on an annual basis,and as a person who uaditing that as my first foray in the work place.
nothing can be exempted in an audit. There is a thing they call an 'audit trail'every team have to check out.
This is the hights of fishing. the problemis that if theyu don't find noithing they won't talk about the wasted funds in the audit,but they hash every enquiry done by that does not finmd wrong to be a waste.

[/ QUOTE ]

Spin Dr Dudd, bwoy, yuh soun more naive every time yuh write ... or are you the official 'distractor/apologist' placed on this board.

Dyoll_73
10-07-2006, 03:59 PM
[ QUOTE ]
ello is dis Heist Consultin?

Yes maam, you have reached The Heist.
I am The Most Honourable PJoke Batterson, former Prime Minister of Jamaica and a Consultant to the GOJ. I operate as a front for BadWorks International, I Chair the Contracts Award and Monitoring Committee of the same.

Sometime ago, a contract was negotiated between the GOJ and a foreign firm by my Committee. This contract was over invoiced to the tune of US$21.5M. This was done deliberately. The over- invoicing was a deal by my committee to benefit from the project. The money is being held in a Suspense Account, which with GOJ permission can be transferred into any Overseas Account. We hope you will be able to provide such an account for us..

SHARE: -

For providing the account where we shall remit the money into, you will be entitled to 30% of the money, 60% will be for me and my partners while 10% has been mapped out from the total sum to cover any expenses that may be incurred by us during the course of this transfer, both locally and international expenses. It may interest you to know that a similar transaction was carried out with one MR. G.O.D., President of JaneTech Intl. The deal was concluded and all covering documents were forwarded to A. Young to authenticate the claim. Once the funds were transferred, MR. A. Young presented his Bank with all the legal documents and remitted the whole funds to another Bank Account and disappeared completely. My colleagues were shattered, as such opportunities do not come all the time. I would require the following: -

1. Your Company's Name, Address, Tel. &amp; Fax. Numbers.

2. Your Bank Account Number and Address where the
money will be remitted.

Wah yu seh sah, dat soun really good!

I assure you maam, you are in for a pretty good windfall.

[/ QUOTE ]

So, PJ(oke) will be continuing with the heist of public funds from when he was PM. He, being a lawyer (a 'smart' one too), could easily remove himself from being directly blamed during the heists, you see. So this will be an international consultancy - I'm assuming he will open an office in Lagos.

RichD
10-07-2006, 10:19 PM
[ QUOTE ]
".Should we be concerned that senior leaders of government appear unaware of the distinction between ethically wrong and illegal conduct? Are they blind to the questionable ethical appearance of this deposit and the way it was handled?"




[/ QUOTE ]

wonder if di PNP a go regret the attack tatic dem a use

Tuff Gong
10-08-2006, 01:36 AM
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
".Should we be concerned that senior leaders of government appear unaware of the distinction between ethically wrong and illegal conduct? Are they blind to the questionable ethical appearance of this deposit and the way it was handled?"




[/ QUOTE ]

wonder if di PNP a go regret the attack tatic dem a use

[/ QUOTE ]

Nope the Pirates of the Caribbean don't care!

Wahalla
10-08-2006, 10:49 AM
[ QUOTE ]

http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/editorial/images/20060912T010000-0500_112803_OBS_EDITORIAL_CARTOON_1.jpg

[/ QUOTE ]


I dont get this Tuffy...I spend a bit of time in Spain and yes no street kids fair health care great food if you eat pork.. But mi dont get the cartoon...(Oh I took a friend opf mine over and she was impressed with the roads..Dem have some seriously good roads.......)

Tuff Gong
10-08-2006, 03:02 PM
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]

http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/editorial/images/20060912T010000-0500_112803_OBS_EDITORIAL_CARTOON_1.jpg

[/ QUOTE ]


I dont get this Tuffy...I spend a bit of time in Spain and yes no street kids fair health care great food if you eat pork.. But mi dont get the cartoon...(Oh I took a friend opf mine over and she was impressed with the roads..Dem have some seriously good roads.......)

[/ QUOTE ]

Well a few weeks ago they threw a party for him in Jamaica, the only problem is he was in Spain. The cartoonist was saying he was living it up on the big pension raise he engineered for himself.

Tuff Gong
10-10-2006, 10:34 AM
Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica (PCJ) could end deal with Dutch oil company
published: Tuesday | October 10, 2006

The controversial 'gift' by Dutch oil company Trafigura Beheer to the People's National Party (PNP) could jeopardise its contract with the state-owned Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica (PCJ), says Dr. Raymond Wright, senior consultant and former group managing director at the PCJ.

At least one government minister, Colin Campbell, who held the information and development portfolios in addition to his post as general secretary of the PNP, has already lost his job in the controversy.

In limbo

"Because of the situation I'm not sure where PCJ wants to go with Trafigura," said Dr. Raymond Wright, the company's former CEO, who is now a senior consultant to the corporation. "... We are in the limbo in terms of the trading situation."

Trafigura has for the past five years had the contract to trade the crude Jamaica buys on concessionary terms from Nigeria, but which is not of a grade that can be refined by the Petrojam oil refinery here and, in any event, is sourced too far away to be shipped to the island given Jamaica's supply agreement with Venezuela.

But the Trafigura agreement exploded into controversy last week, when the Opposition Jamaica Labour Party revealed that the Dutch commodities trader had in August paid the equivalent of J$31 million into a local bank account on which several ruling party officials, including former information minister and PNP general secretary, Colin Campbell were signatories.

Contract renewed

The payment by Trafigura was only weeks before the signing on September 20 of its latest contract with the PCJ, a company that falls within the portfolio of commerce and energy minister, Phillip Paulwell, whose named has been mentioned in connection with the negotiation of the 'gift'.

In the previous agreement, covering October 2005 and April of this year, Trafigura lifted 1,948, 271 barrels of Nigerian crude in Jamaica's behalf, for which the government netted US$170,474 at fixed payment of 12.5 US cents per barrel.

Prior to the fixed rate with the agreement with Trafigura, in which the Dutch trader is responsible for all the take-up expenses, PCJ had a profit-sharing agreement with Vitol SA, which sometimes saw the Jamaican firm losing on deals.

The PCJ's Wright has insisted that the Trafigura deal was better than what previously existed and was good for Jamaica. "They have been very good at lifting and having good relations with NNPC (Nigerian National Petroleum Company) and have paid PCJ promptly," he said.

http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20061010/lead/lead2.html

Tuff Gong
10-12-2006, 11:09 AM
What is the truth?

PCJ's Trafigura contract ironclad
published: Thursday | October 12, 2006

The Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica (PCJ) will not be able to reveal the full financial nature of the Nigerian oil trading deal due to the nature of its contract with Trafigura Beheer.

Dr. Raymond Wright, senior consultant and former group managing director at the PCJ, said that since the state-owned oil company changed the contract from a profit-sharing to a fixed-figure relationship, it would have no right to inspect the books of Trafigura and reveal the level of the Dutch oil company's profits from the deal.

"They will have to open up their books of their own volition, which is the difficulty of an audit," said Dr. Wright.

http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20061012/lead/lead2.html

Centre of controversy

Trafigura has been at the centre of the controversy that saw the resignation of Minister of Information and Development Colin Campbell for misleading his governing People's National Party colleagues, following the revelation by the Opposition Jamaica Labour Party that the Dutch oil company gave a $31 million 'gift' to the party.

Dr. Wright said that the only time PCJ has had access to Trafigura's books was when it changed from profit-sharing to a fixed-fee contract in 2001 over concerns about the levels of its profits. An international auditor was hired for this exercise.

"We became very concerned that any company that dealt with us on a profit-sharing basis could 'pad' their costs," explained Dr. Wright, who added that the audit did not reveal that Trafigura made large profits from the deal.


<u>Article #2</u>

Wed Oct 11, 2006
No contract between Trafigura and PCJ

It has come to light that there is no current contract in place between Trafigura Beheer, the Dutch firm which trades crude oil from Nigeria and the Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica.

The contract which reportedly expired last month has not been renewed.

Special Consultant at the PCJ, Dr. Raymond Wright told our News Centre that no new deal has been signed with Trafigura.

The Opposition has been making a case that the contract between the Government and Trafigura was signed within a fortnight of its generous donation to the People's National Party.

It was an argument that JLP General Secretary Karl Samuda advanced repeatedly on TVJ's current affairs programme All Angles earlier this week.

And it was an argument that Opposition Leader Bruce Golding brought to the House Tuesday when he tabled a no confidence motion against the Government.

But Dr. Wright insists that while a contract was signed with the Nigerian Authority none has yet been signed with Trafigura.

Dr. wright indicated that it is not irregular for the re-negotiation process to be time consuming.

http://www.radiojamaica.com/news/story.php?category=2&amp;story=29046

Yuriatin
10-12-2006, 12:16 PM
The truth is in the eye of the beholder.

Or the contributor - or recipient ... or the consultant! /forums/images/graemlins/shocked.gif

Either way - it aint comin out!
/forums/images/graemlins/70390-shhh.gif

Tuff Gong
10-13-2006, 02:24 PM
Fri Oct 13, 2006
Energy Minister Phillip Paulwell castigated for being silent on Trafigura/PCJ contract

Minister Responsible for the Energy Sector, Phillip Paulwell, is being blasted by the Jamaica Labour Party for failing to clear the air on the contractual arrangement between the Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica (PCJ) and Trafigura.

Since the RJR News Centre broke the news on Wednesday that no contract is in place between Trafigura and the state-run PCJ, there has been confusion on the current arrangement between the two entities.

Opposition Spokesman on Energy, Clive Mullings, has described as unacceptable Mr. Paulwell's continued silence on the matter.

Speaking Thursday on Beyond the Headlines, Mr. Mullings said Mr. Paulwell has failed to carry out his Ministerial responsibilities and has left PCJ officials to face the fire.

The management of the Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica is awaiting instructions from the Board of Directors to determine if Trafigura's contract should be renewed.

http://www.radiojamaica.com/news/story.php?category=2&amp;story=29100

Tuff Gong
10-15-2006, 03:31 PM
Jamaica an accomplice to int'l anti-corruption breach

Shirley Williams
Sunday, October 15, 2006

We have been bombarded by damning revelations, from the leader of Opposition, Mr Bruce Golding, of transactions between Trafigura, the Government of Jamaica (through its agent, Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica (PCJ) and CCOC, a bank account on which the general-secretary of the People's National Party and minister of information and development is a signatory. Trafigura is a global trading company established in 1993 with offices in 36 countries.

It is necessary that these transactions be viewed in the light of national laws and international conventions.
The first issue is the award of the contract by the PCJ for the trading of oil on its behalf, without reference to the Contracts Committee in keeping with the provisions of the Contractor- General Act of 1983. I commend the contractor-general for the steps taken on Tuesday to enquire into the procedural and technical aspects of the contract and await the tabling of his findings in the Parliament.

The second issue is the admission by the PNP that it received a donation of euro 460,000 from Trafigura. Since Trafigura operates in Europe, North, Central and South America, I believe that it is morally and legally bound by the anti-corruption conventions to which these countries are signatories - specifically to those provisions which relate to bribery of public officials and political parties, transparency and accountability in the conduct of business across borders.
If indeed the payment is a business transaction, as alleged by Trafigura, then it would be examined in light of provisions in the several conventions which govern transnational bribery and improper acts or omissions of public officials.

So whether the payments were made pursuant to a business transaction or political donation, they would be viewed in the context of existing anti-corruption conventions. Permit me to briefly examine a few of the relevant conventions.

Undoubtedly, most of our people are unaware that just as there are international trade agreements under the World Trade Organisation (WTO) which govern trade, there are corruption prevention measures in international conventions to which most developed countries, and some less developed ones, are signatories. These conventions legislate the way business is conducted, and political donations made, across borders.

The main conventions are:
. The United Nations Convention Against Corruption - Jamaica signed September 11, 2005
. Inter-American Convention Against Corruption (IACAC) - OAS countries (Jamaica signed March 29, 1996)
. Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Transactions (signed by OECD countries)
. Criminal Law Convention on Corruption (known as COE - signed by 40 member states of the Council Of Europe and eight observer states, including the United States)
. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA - enacted in the United States)

UN Convention

It is my opinion that a political donation, such as Trafigura's, is in violation of the FCPA and the Convention on Combating Bribery of Public Officials in International Business Transactions, adopted by the OECD.

Article 7 of the UN Convention requires each State Party to consider taking appropriate legislative and administrative measures to enhance transparency in the funding of candidates for elected public office, and where applicable, the funding of political parties.

Notwithstanding our Government's failure to implement these measures, it would seem to me that the PNP's admission that it received a political donation from a foreign contractor of the Government, Trafigura, violates Article 5(4) which requires State Parties to collaborate with each other and with relevant international and regional organisations in anti-corruption measures and practices.
The Government of Jamaica, since the funds were received by its minister, may be considered an accomplice to the breach and could be condemned for failure to collaborate with the USA and European countries in their fight against corruption.

<font color="red">Former PM Patterson's role in Goodworks</font>

This brings me to another issue. Under this Convention, a public official is "any person holding a legislative, executive, administrative or judicial office of a State Party". Article 12 requires each State Party to take measures to prevent corruption in the private sector, including:

"Preventing conflict of interest by imposing restrictions, as appropriate and for a reasonable period of time, on the professional activities of former public officials or on the employment of public officials by the private sector after their resignation or retirement, where such activities or employment relate directly to the functions held or supervised by those public officials during their tenure."

We are now aware that Goodworks International played a role in the Trafigura oil transactions. Did former Prime Minister Patterson, now a consultant of Goodworks, play a role in these negotiations? Whether or not, I suggest that his employment by a foreign government contractor, so soon after his retirement, is at best inappropriate.

IACAC

The IACAC, it is said, "represents the first international treaty dealing with the issue of transnational bribery, and the leading example of regional action in the developing world". The Convention is signed and ratified by 28 member states of the OAS. Mandatory domestic provisions require State Parties to criminalise both domestic and foreign bribery and to enact measures to combat illicit enrichment of Government officials.

As far as I am aware, Jamaica has failed to enact any such measures. Again, notwithstanding its tardiness in implementing domestic measures as required by the Convention, it is bound by Article VI of the Convention which governs the solicitation or acceptance by a government or public official "of any article of monetary value, or other benefit, such as a gift". Whether the transaction is a donation to the PNP or a business transaction as alleged by Trafigura, it lacks the accountability, transparency and integrity implicit in the Convention.

OECD Convention

This convention criminalises as bribery of a foreign public official, any offer, promise or gift in order to obtain or retain business or improper advantage in the conduct of international business.

As with the IACAC, excluded from the definition of an offence are payments to political parties, party officials and candidates for political office, all of which are covered by the FCPA. Trafigura operates in OECD countries and is bound to ensure that its business transactions are compatible with OECD anti-corruption conventions. As I said before, it is my opinion that Jamaica, in reportedly accepting the donation, is an accomplice to Trafigura's breaches.

COE (Council of Europe Convention)

This convention criminalises as bribery any "undue advantage" given or received by an official "to act or refrain from acting in exercise of his or her functions". The Convention criminalises both active and passive bribery in the private sector. It also criminalises the bribery of:
. a foreign official;
. members of foreign public assemblies;
. members of international parliamentary assemblies; and
. judges and officials of international courts.
We have not been privy to the commercial agreement which Trafigura says it has with CCOC and so can only question whether it complies with the provisions of the Convention.

USA (FCPA)

Very often, laws are made as a result of public outcry seeking to rectify a problem. In 1977, after revelations of massive payoffs by hundreds of US companies seeking to do business in overseas markets, the United States enacted the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA). Under the provisions of the FCPA, it is a criminal offence for US persons or companies to bribe foreign government officials, political party officials, and candidates for political office in order to obtain business.

I imagine Trafigura will maintain that the transaction is a commercial one free of bribery, and will perhaps claim that only its US-based subsidiaries are bound by this Act. To be certain however, the United States government will be watching this company, if it is not already doing so.

Accountability, transparency and integrity

One positive step has been made in this debacle. This is the intervention of the contractor-general. Last Friday in the Senate, I called upon the auditor-general to audit the transactions of the Nigerian oil facility and all contracts between foreign companies/nationals and the Government of Jamaica or its agencies.

The auditor-general is a constitutional authority and is empowered under the Financial Administration &amp; Audit Act to audit all transactions which impact on the revenues of our country. The auditor-general needs to review each lifting of oil from Nigeria, the volume and price sold and to whom, and all payments made to the Government, its agencies and Jamaican nationals or entities.

In my previous column, I made the observation that "we are a morally bankrupt nation lacking the will to demand honesty and accountability from public officials". The Trafigura issue transcends political boundaries and must be resolved in the best interest of the country. To do any less would be detrimental to this and future generations.

http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/columns/h...ION_BREACH_.asp (http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/columns/html/20061014T190000-0500_114029_OBS_JAMAICA_AN_ACCOMPLICE_TO_INT_L_ANT I_CORRUPTION_BREACH_.asp)

Tuff Gong
10-19-2006, 01:22 PM
An intricate web

By Dateline D.C.
Sunday, October 1, 2006
WASHINGTON

There are five weeks until the midterm elections. But Democrats are acting
as if they are already back in control of the U.S. House.
However, they may yet be confronted with problems created by oil-hungry,
greedy supporters. Among them -- Andrew Young.
Young, 73, a graduate of Howard University, was called to the pastorship in
Marion, Ala., read about Gandhi, married and joined up with Martin Luther
King. After a stint with the National Council of Churches, he joined the
Southern Christian Leadership Conference as executive director.

After the death of Martin Luther King and serving in Congress, Young was
appointed by President Carter to be our ambassador to the United Nations --
a post from which he resigned two years later as a result of unauthorized
meetings with the Palestinian Liberation Organization.
But Young went on to do well for himself -- serving two terms as Atlanta's
mayor, attracting a lot of international money into the city, which also
provided wonderful international contacts.

With others in 1997, including Carter chief of staff Hamilton Jordan, Young
founded a consulting firm, GoodWorks International (GWI), in Atlanta and
Washington, of which he is now vice president. The company is headed by
Carlton "Carl" Masters, a Jamaican-American, with Howard Jeter, a former
U.S. ambassador to Nigeria and high-ranking State Department official, as
executive vice president. GWI offers international market access and
political risk analysis. Democrats were infuriated with Young's first choice
of clients: Nike International and Working Families for Wal-Mart.
That plum assignment ended this year with Young praising Wal-Mart for
running out of town "Jews, then it was Koreans and now its Arabs" who run
mom-and-pop stores in the inner cities.

Young, however, advanced behind the cloak once worn, honorably, by the Rev.
Leon Sullivan, who founded Opportunities Industrialization Centers (OIC) and
hosted African summits. These are now implemented by the foundation that
carries his name. In 2005 and this year, Young, with Bill Clinton in tow,
latched on to these summits.
The foundation is led by a trio, whose president and CEO is Hope Sullivan
Masters, the reverend's daughter and wife of Carl Masters, who now is the
president of GWI and obviously close to Andrew Young.

They are all good friends of Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo, who
retains GWI for a mere $60,000 a month as his Washington presence. The
foundation's directors, other than their important names, include Bill
Clinton, Alexis Herman and Maurice Tempelsman.
Last year, GWI leaders initiated and helped raise cash for the $50 million
Obasanjo Memorial Library project from major companies doing business in
Nigeria. There are pending allegations against Nigeria's president for
starting the "private" library project while still in office, with money
laundering a major alleged component.
While GWI has made an unspecified donation to the library, it is no more
than Obasanjo deserves. After all, for the past seven years GWI has helped
Jamaica -- Carl Masters' birthplace -- manage its oil imports from Nigeria.

According to Jamaican government sources, oil concessions made to that
island country by Nigeria resulted in the Kingston government making at
least $68,000 a month profit.
This past April, P.J. Patterson resigned as Jamaica's prime minister. No one
asked about oil deals -- until he left Jamaica and joined GWI in Washington
as a "senior adviser."
Things went badly wrong with the FBI searching Congressman William
Jefferson's offices and the offices of a small American firm in Houston,
ERHC, which has oil business in Nigeria. Ambassador Howard Jeter is on
ERHC's board as well as working for GWI.
And GWI -- through Andy Young's links to the Nigerian Sun Trust Oil and Carl
Masters' close work with its Nigerian shareholders (and their closeness to
Obasanjo) -- is in the Nigerian oil business.

On Sept. 17, a Nigerian air force plane crashed, killing 13 of that
country's top generals en route to a meeting to discuss the military role in
policing the oil industry from theft and threats of sabotage.
In this wonderful frenzy of giving, could the presidents of the United
States and Nigeria have been inexplicably and illegally well rewarded? For
what? Now is the time for some answers.
Dateline D.C. is written by a Washington-based British journalist and
political observer.

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/opinion/columnists/datelinedc/s_472824.html

Tuff Gong
10-25-2006, 04:25 AM
What all the oil is about:

Ministry paper gives reasons for contracting Trafigura
balford henry, Business Observer writer
Wednesday, October 25, 2006

Nigeria's insistence on the posting of a US$1-million bond and for Jamaica to invest in that African country's economy in order to lift its crude oil were among the reasons that oil trader Trafigura Beheer was contracted, according to Ministry Paper (number 77) which was tabled in the House of Representatives on October 17 by minister of industry, technology, energy and commerce, Phillip Paulwell.

The minister did not participate in the debate on the no-confidence motion against the Government brought by the Opposition, which was defeated in the House, but tabled the Ministry Paper titled 'Background Information on Nigerian Oil Facility'.

According to the ministry paper, there were four reasons why oil traders were needed to fulfil the agreement:

(1) Nigerian crude (other than a shipment to Petrojam Limited to determine sustainability for refining in Jamaica) was never used in Jamaica;

(2) The logistics of lifting, shipping, delivering and selling crude was beyond the capability of PCJ (Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica) at that time;

(3) Nigeria required that any trader of Nigerian crude products had to post a bond of US$1 million (an amount the PCJ could not afford); and

(4) As a prerequiste for entering into the arrangement for the purchase of Nigerian crude oil, the PCJ was required to make investments in the Nigerian economy. (The PCJ could find no affordable opportunity).

The ministry paper noted that, because of the small volumes and the uncertainty of availability of crude oil to be traded by PCJ, the lifter/trader had to be already operating as a trader with the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC) with the requisite infrastructure in place.

Since 1984, the PCJ sought assistance from oil liaison agents in renegotiating and securing the contract. Their duties included, but were not limited to: continuous communications with NNPC on behalf of PCJ to ensure continuity of trading activities, in accordance with the contract; advice on trading details, including the use of tankers; and advice on preferred crude to be lifted, in order to maximise PCJ's profits.

There were two breaks in the contract, according to the ministry paper: the first in January-April 1983 when PCJ was in negotiations with NNPC in regard to Letter of Credit guarantees; and January-October 1985, a period when PCJ would have sustained severe losses in trading had it lifted cargoes, due to the pricing terms of the contract. This led to a change in the pricing terms and cargo lifting commenced again.
In February 1987, the NNPC reduced the PCJ's credit period to the standard 30 days and from then, the contract has been operated on a fully commercial basis.
An Evergreen Contract was signed between the NNPC and the PCJ in August 1993. In October 1993, notice was given by the NNPC to PCJ of the termination of the contract, effective December 1993. This was against the background that all contracts held by the NNPC with all countries, for crude oil sales and petroleum imports and exports, were to be cancelled, the result of a directive from the new Nigerian head of state, Chief Ernest Shonekan.

The Nigerian government invited companies, whose contracts were cancelled, to resubmit applications by November 1993. The PCJ duly submitted its application for renewal of its oil trading contract.

Between December 1993 and October 1, 2000 all efforts by the Government of Jamaica and the PCJ to re-establish the trading agreement between NNPC and PCJ failed. As a result, no oil trading was carried out by PCJ for seven years.
The ministry paper pointed out that the cancellation of the contract was primarily the result of a political decision.

It said that in May 1999, on the return to power of President Olusegun Obasanjo, efforts to renew the agreement began, including a visit to Nigeria by former Prime Minister PJ Patterson and former minister of mining and energy Robert Pickersgill.

"At the same time," the ministry paper went on, "Mr Carl Masters, a Jamaican who was an oil agent for Chevron, noted the difficulty that Jamaica was having in renegotiating its contract with the NNPC. He offered his services to the PCJ. This resulted in the resumption of the trading arrangement and the renewal of the contract. Crude oil cargo uplifts commenced again on October 1, 2000."

"Mr Masters, who is affiliated to Goodworks International, was appointed oil liaison agent for PCJ and has continued in this role since then. Under contractual agreement, Goodworks is paid 15 per cent of the PCJ earnings for their services," the ministry paper added.

Thirty-two crude oil uplifts were made during the six contract periods between October 2000 and April 2006. A total volume of 37,202,334 barrels were lifted which earned the PCJ US$2,799,340.

The ministry paper said that among the projects funded by the oil facility were: the purchase of the Petrojam oil refinery; construction of an energy-efficient building at 36 Trafalgar Road; oil exploration programme; research on peat as fuel; acquisition and development of Font Hill property; LNG prefeasibility study; retrofit government hospitals; schools energy conservation programme; and pay profit tax on net income.

http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/magazines...G_TRAFIGURA.asp (http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/magazines/Business/html/20061024T230000-0500_114465_OBS_MINISTRY_PAPER_GIVES_REASONS_FOR_C ONTRACTING_TRAFIGURA.asp)

Business Observer report inaccurate, says Trafigura

Wednesday, October 25, 2006
Dear Editor,

Your report in the Business Observer of 18 October 'Trafigura figures in South Africa bribery scandal' is inaccurate and defamatory with regard to Trafigura.

The contract between the South African authorities and Trafigura and High Beam referred to in your story was executed with considerable profit to the South African Ministry of Mining and Energy.

Trafigura and High Beam challenged the cancellation of the contract in court and the dispute was eventually resolved in an out-of-court settlement. No fault was found with Trafigura.

The South African Strategic Fuel Fund Association was party to a statement after the settlement confirming that the participation of Trafigura in future contracts was unaffected. As an out-of-court settlement, it goes without saying that there was no court order to repay money earned from the contract.

It is not true that South African government officials "testified" to receiving cash and promises of foreign bank accounts from Trafigura. There was no court hearing on this subject. You are referring to an internal inquiry conducted by the South African authorities.

The facts are that South African officials confirmed that they did not speak to anyone at Trafigura or receive anything from Trafigura.

Graham Sharp
Director
Trafigura Ltd
Portman House
2 Portman Street
London

http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/magazines...S_TRAFIGURA.asp (http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/magazines/Business/html/20061024T230000-0500_114464_OBS_BUSINESS_OBSERVER_REPORT_INACCURAT E__SAYS_TRAFIGURA.asp)

Tuff Gong
11-14-2007, 01:55 PM
<span style='font-size: 20pt'>Dutch Authorities to investigate Trafigura donation</span>
Tuesday, 13 November 2007
Prime Minister Bruce Golding revealed that criminal investigations have been launched by Dutch Authorities.

He said they believe that the oil lifting firm Trafigura Beheer bribed public officials in Jamaica.

<span style="color: #CC0000"><span style='font-size: 14pt'>In a statement to Parliament Tuesday, Mr. Golding said the PNP Government failed to give the Dutch Investigators the official go-ahead to carry out its probe in Jamaica.

Across the floor, the Opposition maintained a stony silence as Mr. Golding moved to revive the near forgotten issue.</span> </span>

Last year, the Dutch firm donated $31 million to a company linked to the People's National Party (PNP).

The matter was brought to the public's attention by then leader of the Opposition Mr. Golding, who indicated that Trafigura had a business arrangement with the Government to lift crude oil from Nigeria.

Charges of conflict of interests were leveled at the Government in the aftermath of the revelations.

This led to the resignation of Colin Campbell as PNP General Secretary and a Government Minister.

The PNP later said it returned the money.

But it seems the issue just will not go away.

Mr. Golding said he had asked the Dutch authorities to initiate investigations, but he was informed that it required the permission of the Jamaican Government to come to into the country.

This was not forthcoming.

But now news has emerged that a criminal investigation has been launched by the National Public Prosecutors Office of the Netherlands against Trafigura.

Mr. Golding told the House that he has instructed the Minister of Justice to issue an Order in accordance with the Mutual Assistance Act to be enforced.

This is to facilitate Dutch investigators into the island.

http://www.radiojamaica.com/content/view/2978/26/

Tuff Gong
11-30-2007, 05:20 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: RichD</div><div class="ubbcode-body">wonder if di PNP a go regret the attack tatic dem a use </div></div>

<span style='font-size: 14pt'>Tragigura debated in the Senate</span>
Friday, 30 November 2007

A tense debate on the affirmative resolution to allow Dutch authorities to extend their investigation of Trafigura Beheer into Jamaica dominated the Senate Friday morning.

Two major investigative bodies from the Netherlands are probing the conduct of the transnational oil lifting firm.

Attorney General and Justice Minister Dorothy Lighbourne, noted that at the time when their oil lifting contract with Jamaica was about to expire, the company donated $31 million to the then governing People's National Party (PNP).

She said Tafigura Beheer is believed to be guilty of bribing public officials in Jamaica, an offence punishable under Dutch laws.

Tension gripped the Senate as Miss Lightbourne referred to Deputy Solicitor General, Stephen Vasciannie's role in discussions last year, over whether Dutch investigators should be allowed to work on local soil.

<span style='font-size: 20pt'><span style="color: #3333FF">Opposition Spokesman on Justice, A.J. Nicholson retreated without making a comment, after rising on a point of order on the matter. </span></span>

Miss Lightbourne said it was on the basis of Professor Vasciannie's legal opinion that the investigators were barred from coming into the island.

http://www.radiojamaica.com/content/view/3463/26/

evanovitch
11-30-2007, 05:31 PM
so u read eena di gossip seh dat dem a seh is smaddy eena di pawty leak info mek all dis a gwane...seems smaddy vex bad an a tawk outta di side a dem mout....guess now dat dem not in powa palm naw grease like fuss time so any slight get act pon...but i is not one to gossip so u neva hear dis from mi /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/70390-shhh.gif

Tuff Gong
11-30-2007, 05:39 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: evanovitch</div><div class="ubbcode-body">so u read eena di gossip seh dat dem a seh is smaddy eena di pawty leak info mek all dis a gwane...</div></div>

But that was well overstood. Remember Mr. Golding said when he first got the info, he thought he was been setup based on the source of the info.

Tuff Gong
11-30-2007, 10:04 PM
Opposition warns government about misuse of law for political expediency
Friday, 30 November 2007

Former Justice Minister K.D. Knight, who piloted the Mutual Assistance Criminal Matters Act in 1995, warned the government against misusing law for political expediency.

Mr. Knight said he supports the investigation of any criminal act and described as reprehensible, the bribery of local officials by personnel from multi-nationals.

He was quick to issue a warning to the Government to ensure that it enforces the Mutual Assistance Criminal Act for the right reasons.

Against this back drop, Mr. Knight queried whether the move by the Government was based on what he described as a ‘shakeable' foundation of principle.

Declaring that the route being pursued, is likely to have grave implications.

Mr. Knight noted that the Act was established on the principle of reciprocity.

Within this context, Mr. Knight challenged the Government to state whether the Netherlands has a Mutual Assistance law in place.

He also queried the existence of a bilateral agreement and domestic legislation in that country.

He said the bilateral treaty makes provisions to protect the rights of persons.

Mr. Knight warned that it should be recognized that the rights of persons are involved and that political expediency is temporary.

http://www.radiojamaica.com/content/view/3479/26/