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Blackstar*
08-26-2006, 04:54 PM
While browsing the pages of the Gleaner and the Observer I've noticed the following pattern:<ul type="square"> the opposition party is very tepid indeed and the statements they do make don't seem to be widely publicized
This statement (http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20060804/lead/lead8.html) was reported in a news brief in one paper and on the Radio Jamaica web site. I never saw it reported elsewhere, i.e. the other major daily paper.

the party in power NEVER responds to allegations made against it
The rebuttal (http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/news/html/20060804T210000-0500_110445_OBS_JPS_DENIES_CLAIM_IT_PLANS_TO_MOVE_ EQUIPMENT_OVERSEAS.asp) is made by the JPS although Mr. Mullings directly addressed the govt. regulatory body and ministry in a call to action. The regulatory body fobbed the problem off on the GOJ, from where, like a black hole, it has never come out again.

neither party ever seems to address the common man on the issues and in terms that can be understood by the electorate ("more man have cyar" does not count)
It took a board member in post #19645971 (http://www.jamaicans.com/forums/showflat.php?Cat=0&amp;Board=11&amp;Number=19643908&amp;page=2 &amp;fpart=1) to explain what all the fuss was about. Why the dickens didn't Mr. Mullings say all that in the first place? I may have missed it, but I haven't seen any follow-up from either party after the JPS issued their statement. Does this mean the problem has gone away?[/list]So what do you think? Should the level of discourse be improved and how? Or is it just right as it is?

Tuff Gong
08-26-2006, 10:42 PM
[ QUOTE ]
While browsing the pages of the Gleaner and the Observer I've noticed the following pattern:<ul type="square"> the opposition party is very tepid indeed and the statements they do make don't seem to be widely publicized
This statement (http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20060804/lead/lead8.html) was reported in a news brief in one paper and on the Radio Jamaica web site. I never saw it reported elsewhere, i.e. the other major daily paper.

the party in power NEVER responds to allegations made against it
The rebuttal (http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/news/html/20060804T210000-0500_110445_OBS_JPS_DENIES_CLAIM_IT_PLANS_TO_MOVE_ EQUIPMENT_OVERSEAS.asp) is made by the JPS although Mr. Mullings directly addressed the govt. regulatory body and ministry in a call to action. The regulatory body fobbed the problem off on the GOJ, from where, like a black hole, it has never come out again.

neither party ever seems to address the common man on the issues and in terms that can be understood by the electorate ("more man have cyar" does not count)
It took a board member in post #19645971 (http://www.jamaicans.com/forums/showflat.php?Cat=0&amp;Board=11&amp;Number=19643908&amp;page=2 &amp;fpart=1) to explain what all the fuss was about. Why the dickens didn't Mr. Mullings say all that in the first place? I may have missed it, but I haven't seen any follow-up from either party after the JPS issued their statement. Does this mean the problem has gone away?[/list]So what do you think? Should the level of discourse be improved and how? Or is it just right as it is?

[/ QUOTE ]

It will take a very long time to explain what is a very simple answer. The PNP leaders like Stalin, General Franco, Mussolini and Hitler used State Repression to their best advantage. It is very dangerous be in disagreement with the PNP in Jamaica and this is not just talking politically.
It is very dangerous to be a Labourite and even more dangerous to be a Labourite with opinions that you express publicly.

Criticism of any move by Government, even in its mildest form is generally met with:<ul type="square"> you are a Labourite and all you want to do is oppose, oppose, oppose
you don't like progress
you find a problem for every solution
you don't like good news/you are anti-black/Jamaican/poor
you are just playing politics[/list]
This can be all summed up in the following well thought out highly cerebral statements made by various functionaries and worse leaders of the Governing Party:
<ul type="square"> Politics is about who get what, when, where and how
The fight for scarce goods and spoils have created a polarized society in which we operate as hostile tribes perpetually at war
We always think that is best for us to form the Government. Therefore anything that leads us or causes us to form the Government we believe is our best interests and the interests of the country
jook dem with the free education/Cuban Dacta
more man have gyal/cyar/house, etc
my leeda barn yah
In Jamaica, murder is a part of politics
[/list]

Blackstar*
08-27-2006, 02:07 AM
What's wrong with this picture? More importantly what is going on in the heads of constituents? Do they really think their lot and that of Jamaica will improve with this kind of thinking? /forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif

[ QUOTE ]
Confronted with information about a number of government scandals prior to the last elections, I heard a Central Kingston woman declare, "Mi nuh care, wi still a go win back". It is this absence of outrage that is nationwide, which convinces me that our situation is not going to change in the foreseeable future. Source (http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20060826/letters/letters1.html)

[/ QUOTE ]

Blackstar*
08-27-2006, 05:05 AM
This topic doesn't seem to be very inspiring, eh Tuffy? LOL
Anyway here is more fodder for the discussion.

[ QUOTE ]
Manipulating the media (http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/columns/html/20060819T200000-0500_111588_OBS_MANIPULATING_THE_MEDIA_.asp)
Wignall's World
Mark Wignall
Sunday, August 20, 2006


In the last week or so, the airwaves and the newspapers have been filled with items and stories which have made more than a mention of the prime minister. And, of course, her charming face has been seen on television and in the newspapers.

In weeks prior to that, some in the PNP made the accusation that a significant percentage of JLP politicians have been manipulating the media, as if that exercise by a political party is not within the bounds of the party's ultimate objective - that of winning state power and holding it for as long as possible.

It seems that a few bright heads in the PNP have rediscovered 'manipulation' of the media. I jest, of course, because much of what Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller had to say was national in scope - PetroCaribe, Sandals Whitehouse, new raids (pending) on the surpluses from NIS and NHT, etc - and would have had to be carried anyway.

In the days after the PM made her inaugural budget presentation, I received a few e-mail transmittals from middle-class, educated Portia supporters either softly criticising me for my harsh criticism of her or imploring me to be more patient with her. One even suggested that because she is a woman and hence, more emotional, she would not handle these criticisms well and would instead erupt out of earshot of others, after which she would lock into herself, listen to none and become defensive.

Leaders from any and all persuasions hate to be criticised. The theory presupposes that leaders are all-inclusive. The reality is closer to the truth. Persons become leaders because they tend to have more suggestions/solutions than others, are naturally assertive and aggressive and they are not used to being interrupted or criticised when they are on the way up. Most importantly, leaders tend to believe in themselves before all others.

My criticisms of the PM are quite straightforward. Leave the preaching for the clergyman and engage the people in an ongoing national dialogue. Tell the people the truth about our financial state of affairs. Open up herself to more press conferences where she and her technocrats can spell out to us what more effort is needed from the people and say how our socio-economic salvation is going to be assisted and directed by her own efforts.

Taken as a whole, the media are more powerful than either the PNP or the JLP. All politicians come to know this early so they tend to act 'user-friendly' to various media persons/houses when many of us in the media know that politicians hate our guts.

In the efforts to win and maintain state power, the politician has a range of choices laid out before him. The worst is, and has always been, the use of the gun in terrorising the votes [away] from the other side. Then there is bribing persons to influence the vote.

This can either be in the form of paying one centre of influence (usually a ruthless gunman) or hauling cash directly to the communities where the vote is uncertain.
Third from the bottom is employing very expensive ad campaigns to spread lies or failings of the other side while preening the feathers of its own 'successes' or its intentions. Fourth is the bribing of media persons where moderate amounts are offered to 'cover' a story where the mundane is made into manna from political heaven.

Third is just being nice to the media by employing all of the tactics of the most savvy public relations experts. That covers the cocktail parties and the fetes where media persons are invited to drink, eat and chat for free. Whether it is pate de foi gras or boiled green bananas in pot water, it is still a 'pay-out' of sorts, which is tacitly prefaced by, 'Don't be so hard on me when next I muck up'.

The second and the first are spelling out to the likely voters, through media-covered meetings, the range of policies and issues that the party is carrying to the nation, while degrading the efforts of the 'other side'.

Both the PNP and the JLP are always in the process of taking a newly revamped leadership to the large mass of people. The prime minister has always had a head start on the JLP because Golding is very hard to sell.

He speaks well, says all of the right things, has the perfect body language while delivering a speech, but the electorate judges him by first deducting some approval, while in judging Portia, approval is added before she opens her mouth.

[/ QUOTE ]

Tuff Gong
08-27-2006, 11:32 AM
[ QUOTE ]
What's wrong with this picture? More importantly what is going on in the heads of constituents? Do they really think their lot and that of Jamaica will improve with this kind of thinking? /forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif

[ QUOTE ]
Confronted with information about a number of government scandals prior to the last elections, I heard a Central Kingston woman declare, "Mi nuh care, wi still a go win back". It is this absence of outrage that is nationwide, which convinces me that our situation is not going to change in the foreseeable future. Source (http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20060826/letters/letters1.html)

[/ QUOTE ]

[/ QUOTE ]

This is the real Jamaica. The politics scarce goods and spoils has been a very successful tool.
Keep them hungry and illiterate and then give enough of them a few dollars and they will catch and keep the slaves for you.

In the election to replace PJ after he stepped down as the MP in his constituency one lady declared that she was going to vote PNP because M. Menlie gave her a house.

Mr. M. Menlie has been dead for years now and last held any office in 1992, yet the power of the curry-goat politricks is so strong that a gift given in an election year, 5-10-15-20 years ago is still enough to buy ones vote in any future elections.

wolmersboy
08-27-2006, 01:39 PM
Before the level of the political discourse in Jamaica can be upgraded, the population as a whole needs to become more sophisticated in matters political. Children in school need to be taught citizenship and history so they can learn how to function more effectively in a democratic society. Critical thinking and reasoning need to be encouraged. Blindly following anyone--politician or religious leader--is a sure way to end up in disaster.

Tuff Gong
08-28-2006, 04:37 PM
[ QUOTE ]
Before the level of the political discourse in Jamaica can be upgraded, the population as a whole needs to become more sophisticated in matters political. Children in school need to be taught citizenship and history so they can learn how to function more effectively in a democratic society. Critical thinking and reasoning need to be encouraged. Blindly following anyone--politician or religious leader--is a sure way to end up in disaster.

[/ QUOTE ]

We use to be thought Civics but it was held to be not needed under Blackman Time Now.

Of course this leads to a few other admissions or choice revelations from the leadership.

On the issues of corruption on it effects on the party vying for elections.

Scandals and talk about corruption don't mean too much, when it comes to voting time all that is forgotten.

On laws and the government’s duty to be bounded by them:

The law is not a shackle!

One playing by the rules:

In Jamaica the man who plays by the rules is the man that gets shafted.

Blackstar*
08-28-2006, 05:07 PM
I agree with your assessment and that of wolmersboy, yet the Opposition has not come through with a strong, unifying, anti-corruption message. Democracy does not and cannot thrive without a powerful opposition which offers a plausible alternative for the electorate.

The PNP is failing Jamaica, but the JLP seems unable to convince people of this most obvious fact.

At the risk of sounding like a conspiracy theorist, I wonder if the Opposition really have better policies for Jamaica or are they secretly happy with (and benefitting from) the status quo?

Blackstar*
08-28-2006, 05:32 PM
[ QUOTE ]
Blackman Time Now.

The law is not a shackle!

[/ QUOTE ]

PJ did give us some catchy slogans though - “more man have cell-phone, more man have car, more man have gal” being another one. The Opposition should get some good lyrics from a dancehall artiste. LOL

Which leads me to another thought: since the masses aren't as educated as they could be, perhaps popular culture could be used to better communicate with people. I used to love the political satire of T&amp;T calypso and wished for a similar tradition in JA.

Tuff Gong
08-29-2006, 12:11 AM
[ QUOTE ]
I agree with your assessment and that of wolmersboy, yet the Opposition has not come through with a strong, unifying, anti-corruption message. Democracy does not and cannot thrive without a powerful opposition which offers a plausible alternative for the electorate.

The PNP is failing Jamaica, but the JLP seems unable to convince people of this most obvious fact.

At the risk of sounding like a conspiracy theorist, I wonder if the Opposition really have better policies for Jamaica or are they secretly happy with (and benefitting from) the status quo?

[/ QUOTE ]

The answer to the above in you post below.

[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
Blackman Time Now.

The law is not a shackle!

[/ QUOTE ]

PJ did give us some catchy slogans though - “more man have cell-phone, more man have car, more man have gal” being another one. The Opposition should get some good lyrics from a dancehall artiste. LOL

Which leads me to another thought: since the masses aren't as educated as they could be, perhaps popular culture could be used to better communicate with people. I used to love the political satire of T&amp;T calypso and wished for a similar tradition in JA.

[/ QUOTE ]

The PNP has catchy gutter phrases to match their pork barrel politics. Who can beat the?
They are very good at giving the people what they want, but it this good for Jamaica?

As to the Opposition not stirring the minds of the people, they need to but maybe not as would be overstood in the traditional sense.
What they seems need is, a smarter Eddie Blinds. One who is willing to go to the trenches, a man like Audrey Shaw who will tell them that the JLP need not put one single policy forward, because under the Westminster System the Opposition is a Government in waiting, if the party in power cannot do the job then they must either resign, call an election or be forced to call one.

The Opposition and other Jamaicans have put forward many workable plans, not one has been given a chance by the people of Jamaica or even spat upon PNP in Government.

This iteration of the PNP in Government has been the most advised, the most pampered and yet the most inept. They have more consultants than has ever been employed to any Government in the history of Jamaica, since Independence. Now if they cannot do the job all the Opposition needs to do is to confront them, get them to give the Jamaican voters a chance to try something different.

..but we are talking about Jamaica and as Bob said:

We keep on fighting
And when we are going to get some food
Yu brother got to be your enemy

So the PNP plays the divide and rule game like no other.

Tuff Gong
08-29-2006, 02:23 AM
Here is the answer to all the questions you posed.

http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/editorial/images/20060828T200000-0500_112173_OBS_EDITORIAL_CARTOON_1.jpg

Blackstar*
08-29-2006, 02:54 AM
NHT surplus = Robbing the poor to give to the poor
Venezuela funds = More loans
Church votes = /forums/images/graemlins/70374-lipsrsealed.gif

In sum, this all sounds rather hopeless, as if the only thing left to do is fill one's pockets while one can. Is that so? Tings can nevah bettah? /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif

Tuff Gong
08-29-2006, 12:44 PM
[ QUOTE ]
NHT surplus = Robbing the poor to give to the poor
Venezuela funds = More loans
Church votes = /forums/images/graemlins/70374-lipsrsealed.gif

In sum, this all sounds rather hopeless, as if the only thing left to do is fill one's pockets while one can. Is that so? Tings can nevah bettah? /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif

[/ QUOTE ]

To continue this diss-course.

The most powerful official of the GOJ next to the Prime Minister, the Minister Of Finance tells us that it is indeed hopeless under his and is comrades reign:

On two occasions he told us that Jamaicans are not hard workers and that is why the GOJ allows the foreign investors to bring in even labourers to work on their projects.

He has described the young people in his constituency between 15 and 35 as being uneducated, unemployable and irredeemable.

He has also said Jamaicans are over-taxed, yet he is finding even more un-creative ways to finance his giveaways.

Of course the piece de resistance is his revelation that when it was time to pay the police and the firemen and he went to his creditors in Paris and Milan they are not concerned about the social conditions in Jamaica, all they care about his Jamaica's ability to pay its debts.

So are we in a hopeless situation or not?

Blackstar*
09-03-2006, 09:19 AM
<font color="blue">Somehow, I don't think PSM will agree to this. It's a good sign that Golding is getting aggressive though.
---------------------------------------------------------</font>

'BRING IT ON!' - Bruce Golding challenges PM to political debate (http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20060903/lead/lead1.html)
published: Sunday | September 3, 2006

Earl Moxam, Senior Gleaner Writer

Despite recent poll findings placing him as the underdog to Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller, Opposition Leader Bruce Golding is challenging her to a series of debates ahead of the upcoming general election.

Mr. Golding, raring to match debating skills with the charismatic Prime Minister, told The Sunday Gleaner that he would welcome having "one-a-week" and not just after the date of the election is announced. Apparently bolstered by favourable opinion poll findings, the Prime Minister on the weekend alerted party functionaries to prepare themselves for a general election.

The opportunity for Golding to debate Simpson Miller might be presented if a privately-funded effort to put on the debates is accepted by the two major political parties. Both have acknowledged receiving an invitation from the National Debate Commission to participate in pre-election debates.

Christopher Castriota, communications officer with the governing People's National Party acknowledged that the party had received a proposal to engage in the debates. The matter was being carefully considered, Castriota said.

'Lack of direction'
Appearing unfazed by the recent slew of unfavourable poll results, Mr. Golding decried the Prime Minister's performance, citing a "lack of direction" and a failure to define her leadership. "Her prime ministership has to be about more than dipping into the Housing Trust and dipping into the National Insurance Fund," scoffed the Opposition Leader.

Ironically, Mrs. Simpson Miller gets less favourable ratings than her predecessor, P.J. Patterson, from Mr. Golding. Patterson, he said, was always able to "hold a cohesive organisation of government together" and give a clear indication of the direction in which his administration was headed, even if there was discomfort with some of his policy choices. On the other hand, Golding claimed, there was no such direction or cohesiveness to the current administration.

wolmersboy
09-03-2006, 10:11 AM
[ QUOTE ]
<font color="blue">Somehow, I don't think PSM will agree to this. It's a good sign that Golding is getting aggressive though.
---------------------------------------------------------</font>

'BRING IT ON!' - Bruce Golding challenges PM to political debate (http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20060903/lead/lead1.html)
published: Sunday | September 3, 2006

Earl Moxam, Senior Gleaner Writer

Despite recent poll findings placing him as the underdog to Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller, Opposition Leader Bruce Golding is challenging her to a series of debates ahead of the upcoming general election.

Mr. Golding, raring to match debating skills with the charismatic Prime Minister, told The Sunday Gleaner that he would welcome having "one-a-week" and not just after the date of the election is announced. Apparently bolstered by favourable opinion poll findings, the Prime Minister on the weekend alerted party functionaries to prepare themselves for a general election.

The opportunity for Golding to debate Simpson Miller might be presented if a privately-funded effort to put on the debates is accepted by the two major political parties. Both have acknowledged receiving an invitation from the National Debate Commission to participate in pre-election debates.

Christopher Castriota, communications officer with the governing People's National Party acknowledged that the party had received a proposal to engage in the debates. The matter was being carefully considered, Castriota said.

'Lack of direction'
Appearing unfazed by the recent slew of unfavourable poll results, Mr. Golding decried the Prime Minister's performance, citing a "lack of direction" and a failure to define her leadership. "Her prime ministership has to be about more than dipping into the Housing Trust and dipping into the National Insurance Fund," scoffed the Opposition Leader.

Ironically, Mrs. Simpson Miller gets less favourable ratings than her predecessor, P.J. Patterson, from Mr. Golding. Patterson, he said, was always able to "hold a cohesive organisation of government together" and give a clear indication of the direction in which his administration was headed, even if there was discomfort with some of his policy choices. On the other hand, Golding claimed, there was no such direction or cohesiveness to the current administration.

[/ QUOTE ]

I think having debates is a fantastic idea. Put the issues out there. Let the people hear for themselves what vision the party leaders have for Jamaica. It would go a long ways to help raise the level of political discourse.

Tuff Gong
09-03-2006, 10:30 PM
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
<font color="blue">Somehow, I don't think PSM will agree to this. It's a good sign that Golding is getting aggressive though.
---------------------------------------------------------</font>

[/ QUOTE ]

I think having debates is a fantastic idea. Put the issues out there. Let the people hear for themselves what vision the party leaders have for Jamaica. It would go a long ways to help raise the level of political discourse.

[/ QUOTE ]

I never care too much for the debate ting.....but dis year yes man!
Let the Simpleton prove that she can hangle Bruce.

Blackstar*
09-04-2006, 03:42 AM
[ QUOTE ]
Before the level of the political discourse in Jamaica can be upgraded, the population as a whole needs to become more sophisticated in matters political. Children in school need to be taught citizenship and history so they can learn how to function more effectively in a democratic society. Critical thinking and reasoning need to be encouraged. Blindly following anyone--politician or religious leader--is a sure way to end up in disaster.

[/ QUOTE ]

Yes this approach should be taken for the youths.

But what about big people who are no longer in school? Wignall said this in his column yesterday:<font color="blue"> "If, for example, a voter aged 54, who cannot read, write or divide one by five should be asked "When you look at Portia Simpson Miller and Bruce Golding, who do you believe would do the better job of saving Jamaica from the ravages of global warming?" the respondent says in his mind, 'I have no idea wha dis girl a ask mi'.
But he figures that Portia is 'a good person' so it must be Portia, so he answers, "Poosha"."</font>

Complex topics like global warming and local environmental issues need to be explained properly to citizens who can't read or write, yet despite their illiteracy are not stupid. In certain countries, ballots have pictures of the candidates so voters know who to choose. While Jamaica's illiteracy rate is not that bad, we could use some visual and oral equivalent to engage a debate with the people.

wolmersboy
09-04-2006, 08:49 AM
Agreed.

Some good explanatory documentaries on the environment, foreign debt and the political process, specifically aimed at folks like you described, wouldn't hurt, either.

Tuff Gong
09-04-2006, 01:06 PM
Here is one aspect of the bias in the Press.

Lessons to be learnt

The Stoll Poll has confirmed the earlier findings by the Bill Johnson Poll that Prime Minister Portia Simpson-Miller is overwhelmingly more popular than Opposition Leader Bruce Golding at this stage. We understand the relative standing of the political parties in relation to each other is somewhat closer than the distance between their respective leaders. However, the Polls have put the PM ahead of the Opposition Leader in every category except public speaking.
All of this obviously bodes well for the ruling PNP in its quest for a fifth consecutive term in Government. Those who are in the know have indicated that there is significant financial support from a not insubstantial clique within the private sector for the JLP. Words like mind boggling have been used to describe the kind of cash that has been put at the disposal of the JLP.

At the same time they are saying that PM Portia Simpson-Miller is not likely to get the financial support despite the enormous popular support she enjoys. We hope the JLP strategists remember one of the lessons garnered from the presidential contest within the PNP in which she trounced her opponents despite having and spending more money than she was able to do.

The Jamaican electorate is increasingly sophisticated and cannot be bought and sold by the highest bidder. Jamaican politics is replete with this lesson, however, there are still many within the ranks of the rich and powerful who believe that they can buy their way to Gordon House and beyond.

We do wonder however, what is behind the enormous war chest and largesse? What is the interest that they are seeking to secure? What is the danger they are seeking to prevent? And more profoundly, what do they expect in return?

While enjoying the lead the PM and her team should not take the goodwill of the people towards her for granted. It is important not to betray the people’s faith in her. All of this popularity needs to be made to count for something very tangible in the experience of the ordinary people of the land.

We understand that it is not a push button operation, but it cannot be business as usual. And we believe the PM is wise enough to understand that the people’s trust must never be betrayed.

http://www.sunheraldjamaica.com/editorial1.htm

Blackstar*
09-04-2006, 02:16 PM
<font color="blue">Portia reckons silence is golden</font> /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif

[ QUOTE ]
"During the short period of time that I have been prime minister, there have been some criticisms about my not talking enough; but I was told that governments internationally love to 'chat' too much and that governments talk 90 per cent of the time and implement 10."
According to Simpson Miller, in trying to "implement, to get close to the 90 per cent and talk ten," she has been criticised for "not talking".

"I am sure you will agree with me that what you want to see is deliverables, what you want must be action, not 'a bag of mouth'. And I can assure you that despite the limited resources my government will try everything it can to ensure that while we balance the books, we balance people's lives," Simpson Miller told an appreciative group of listeners. More... (http://jamaicaobserver.com/news/html/20060903T220000-0500_112489_OBS_GOV_T__NOT_CARELESS_.asp)

[/ QUOTE ]

Tuff Gong
09-04-2006, 02:26 PM
[ QUOTE ]
<font color="blue">Portia reckons silence is golden</font> /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif

[ QUOTE ]
"During the short period of time that I have been prime minister, there have been some criticisms about my not talking enough; but I was told that governments internationally love to 'chat' too much and that governments talk 90 per cent of the time and implement 10."
According to Simpson Miller, in trying to "implement, to get close to the 90 per cent and talk ten," she has been criticised for "not talking".

"I am sure you will agree with me that what you want to see is deliverables, what you want must be action, not 'a bag of mouth'. And I can assure you that despite the limited resources my government will try everything it can to ensure that while we balance the books, we balance people's lives," Simpson Miller told an appreciative group of listeners. More... (http://jamaicaobserver.com/news/html/20060903T220000-0500_112489_OBS_GOV_T__NOT_CARELESS_.asp)

[/ QUOTE ]

[/ QUOTE ]

Wait a second she was doing a lot of talking and still doing a lot of talking. In church and at the various party functions. What she is not talking about is how she gwine get the country out of the mess. Robbing the poor to give the poor is not a valid option.... except for a current and bankrupt government.

Blackstar*
09-05-2006, 08:56 AM
EDITORIAL: The danger of not debating
published: Tuesday | September 5, 2006

We are disappointed that the Prime Minister, Mrs. Simpson Miller, would insist that she has no need to debate Mr. Bruce Golding, the Opposition Leader, as she declared in her speech at the weekend.

Unless, that is, we have not grasped fully the nuance of Mrs. Simpson Miller's statement. Perhaps her argument that she did not have to prove herself in debate did not mean she would not or had no intention of debating Mr. Golding.

It is likely, therefore, that the Prime Minister means that there is no need, at this time, to meet Mr. Golding face-to-face, in a cut-and-thrust exchange and debate of ideas and visions. Her job, at this time, is to get on with the business of government. She will be willing to engage in the face-to-face vision thing during a real election campaign.

If that is the Prime Minister's thinking, then so be it. More... (http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20060905/cleisure/cleisure1.html)

Tuff Gong
09-05-2006, 11:55 AM
[ QUOTE ]
EDITORIAL: The danger of not debating
published: Tuesday | September 5, 2006

We are disappointed that the Prime Minister, Mrs. Simpson Miller, would insist that she has no need to debate Mr. Bruce Golding, the Opposition Leader, as she declared in her speech at the weekend.

Unless, that is, we have not grasped fully the nuance of Mrs. Simpson Miller's statement. Perhaps her argument that she did not have to prove herself in debate did not mean she would not or had no intention of debating Mr. Golding.

It is likely, therefore, that the Prime Minister means that there is no need, at this time, to meet Mr. Golding face-to-face, in a cut-and-thrust exchange and debate of ideas and visions. Her job, at this time, is to get on with the business of government. She will be willing to engage in the face-to-face vision thing during a real election campaign.

If that is the Prime Minister's thinking, then so be it. More... (http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20060905/cleisure/cleisure1.html)

[/ QUOTE ]

The press in Jamaica while appearing to be critical will always hand the Village Fool a lifeline. LOL!

wolmersboy
09-05-2006, 04:56 PM
[ QUOTE ]
EDITORIAL: The danger of not debating
published: Tuesday | September 5, 2006

We are disappointed that the Prime Minister, Mrs. Simpson Miller, would insist that she has no need to debate Mr. Bruce Golding, the Opposition Leader, as she declared in her speech at the weekend.

Unless, that is, we have not grasped fully the nuance of Mrs. Simpson Miller's statement. Perhaps her argument that she did not have to prove herself in debate did not mean she would not or had no intention of debating Mr. Golding.

It is likely, therefore, that the Prime Minister means that there is no need, at this time, to meet Mr. Golding face-to-face, in a cut-and-thrust exchange and debate of ideas and visions. Her job, at this time, is to get on with the business of government. She will be willing to engage in the face-to-face vision thing during a real election campaign.

If that is the Prime Minister's thinking, then so be it. More... (http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20060905/cleisure/cleisure1.html)

[/ QUOTE ]

You know, if this is the best our newspapers can give us, then maybe we shouldn't be so hard on the voters...not much of an example of critical thinking and challenging people's positions, is it? /forums/images/graemlins/70402-thinking.gif

Tuff Gong
09-05-2006, 11:53 PM
[ QUOTE ]
You know, if this is the best our newspapers can give us, then maybe we shouldn't be so hard on the voters...not much of an example of critical thinking and challenging people's positions, is it? /forums/images/graemlins/70402-thinking.gif

[/ QUOTE ]

That the best they can deliver and yet we should not be so hard on the voters because they have been schooled in the ways of the stoopid.

Blackstar*
09-09-2006, 07:59 AM
Public invited to 'THINK' with PNP aspirants today (http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/westernnews/html/20060906T230000-0500_112598_OBS_PUBLIC_INVITED_TO__THINK__WITH_PNP _ASPIRANTS_TODAY.asp)
Mark Cummings
Thursday, September 07, 2006

The five men who are aspiring to represent Central Westmoreland on the ticket of the ruling Peoples National Party (PNP) will participate in a public panel discussion in Westmoreland at Independence Park, Hendon Circle today.

The discussion entitled "THINK", is expected to kick-off at 6:00 pm, and is being put on by Dawn Mullings, founder of Hope Events Planning, a three-year-old private company.

Mullings, who lives in Westmoreland, told the Observer West that as a lover of politics, she was staging the event as a service to the public.

"The objective of the panel discussion is to give the public an opportunity to understand what the aspirants are all about and to start thinking about the relevant issues. Even though it is just the delegates that will vote at first, at some time the public will be called to vote for at least one of them," she said.
The five aspirants are Carey Wallace, a hotelier; Leonard Green, a lawyer, Paul Buchanan, a consultant; Paul Wilson, an engineer and Dr Victor Watt an engineer and lecturer at the University of Technology (UTech).

All emerged with ambitions to run against the opposition Jamaica Labour Party's (JLP) Russel Hammond in the wake of former cabinet minister, Dr Karl Blythe's decision not to contest the seat at the next polls.

Veteran journalist Lloyd B Smith will moderate the event which is being sponsored in part by some members of Westmoreland's business community who wished to remain anonymous.

Blackstar*
09-09-2006, 08:02 AM
<font color="blue">Now, Portia, about that debate...
-------------------------------------</font>

Golding dares Gov't to accept national debate (http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20060909/lead/lead5.html)
published: Saturday | September 9, 2006

Edmond Campbell, Senior News Coordinator


Opposition Leader Bruce Golding (third right) with Member of Parliament for Eastern St. Andrew, Dr. St. Aubyn Bartlett (second right), leads Jamaica Labour Party supporters on a tour of the constituency yesterday. - Junior Dowie/Staff Photographer


Opposition Leader Bruce Golding has challenged the governing People's National Party (PNP) to face off in national debates with the full slate of Opposition shadow ministers.

Mr. Golding's latest invitation to the governing People's National Party (PNP), for national debates, came yesterday.

A recent suggestion that the Prime Minister and Opposition Leader engage in weekly debates on national issues was dismissed by Information Minister and General Secretary of the PNP, Colin Campbell.

Too busy

In a letter to the editor, Mr. Campbell argued that Mrs. Simpson Miller could not be expected to participate in weekly debates to the detriment of the nation's business.

But speaking with journalists yesterday during a tour of the Eastern St. Andrew constituency, a marginal JLP seat, held by Dr. St. Aubyn Bartlett, Mr. Golding said he had proposed to the National Debate Commission that debates be held at the leisure of the contenders, followed by final debates when elections are called.

He said the discussions would allow voters to get a better understanding of the choices they have and the decisions they would ultimately make.

"If the Prime Minister is too busy to have debates on national issues in order to enable the public to be informed as to the direction in which she intends to take the country then I wonder what else she is too busy to do," the Opposition Leader said.

Golding ready

Mr. Golding said whenever the debates were called he would be ready, noting that the party was not only depending on that approach to win the next election.

Meanwhile, scores of party faithful braved the moderate afternoon showers to meet and greet the Opposition Leader.

Residents of Tavern, St. Andrew, highlighted some of the problems affecting the community, including massive soil erosion near the banks of the Hope River, which has left a number of homes at risk.

Mr. Golding said the MP has made repeated representation on behalf of the residents to get the authorities to address the problems to no avail.

Tuff Gong
09-09-2006, 04:57 PM
She can run but she can't hide.

As for the spurious argument about Golding did switch, here is a letter that says it all:

Switching is not a sin
published: Saturday | September 9, 2006

The Editor, Sir:

The argument about Bruce Golding's switch from JLP to NDM and back, descended to its most ridiculous state when Mr. Brascoe Lee emphatically suggested that politicians who do such switching should not be trusted.

Mr. Lee may not have known that Winston Churchill of world renown was fully trusted by Britain during the most challenging years of World War II; and this was done although he had shifted party allegiance between Conservative and Liberal when his judgement so directed. Neither party scorned his talent and he was indeed made head of the Coalition Cabinet that led his country during those crucial conflicts around the globe.

For Mr. Lee's further information, Jamaica has seen distinguished service by many persons who at some time or other changed their political affiliation.

Bustamante was once a member of the PNP. Burnett Coke was a well respected Speaker of the House after moving from JLP to PNP. Rose Leon was an outstanding Minister in both parties; and the brilliant Ken Hill found opportunity to serve in the PNP as well as the JLP.

In recent times, less noted politicians have crossed party lines and been warmly received by the PNP. The latest is none other than Mr. Lee who, I suppose, expects to be trusted despite his scornful utterances about turncoats like himself.

Turning coat is not necessarily a bad thing, especially when it is based on some stated principle that affects the good order of governance. Unfortunately, the recent cases have all come about because of personality conflicts rather than policy issues of any importance to the electorate. It does appear that without a party coat some of these people are as naked as can be.

I am, etc.,

KEN JONES

http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20060909/letters/letters4.html

Blackstar*
09-18-2006, 03:44 AM
Tuff Gong, Donikka, and Wolmersboy have made some interesting observations regarding the state of the press an on specific articles going easy on elected officials. With the exception that Wolmersboy and Donikka haven't characterized the PNP as "despotic", this statement from Tuff Gong does more or less accurately summarize what has been said so far.
[ QUOTE ]
One cannot rely upon the so-called 4th Estate which have acted more in the vanguard of a corrupt despotic PNP than in defense of the Jamaican citizens.

[/ QUOTE ]

At the moment, I rely on the press published on the Internet for info (as opposed to TV and radio) and it looks to me that they are really slacking - lack of money? expertise? experience?

- Some articles are published directly as is from the JIS! (http://www.jamaicans.com/forums/showflat.php?Cat=0&amp;Number=19661681&amp;an=0&amp;page=0#Pos t19661681)

- Articles are written with only one side presented.

- No "dossiers" available to follow major issues from the first article written to the latest.

One of the positives: the Observer cartoonist is kicking a$$! His cartoons could be posted on billboards throughout Jamaica. Have a series re. NHT on one side of the road. A series on 'God' on the other side of the road, etc., etc.

niceniss
09-18-2006, 10:02 PM
[ QUOTE ]

She can run but she can't hide.

As for the spurious argument about Golding did switch, here is a letter that says it all:

Switching is not a sin
published: Saturday | September 9, 2006

The Editor, Sir:

The argument about Bruce Golding's switch from JLP to NDM and back, descended to its most ridiculous state when Mr. Brascoe Lee emphatically suggested that politicians who do such switching should not be trusted.

Mr. Lee may not have known that Winston Churchill of world renown was fully trusted by Britain during the most challenging years of World War II; and this was done although he had shifted party allegiance between Conservative and Liberal when his judgement so directed. Neither party scorned his talent and he was indeed made head of the Coalition Cabinet that led his country during those crucial conflicts around the globe.

For Mr. Lee's further information, Jamaica has seen distinguished service by many persons who at some time or other changed their political affiliation.

Bustamante was once a member of the PNP. Burnett Coke was a well respected Speaker of the House after moving from JLP to PNP. Rose Leon was an outstanding Minister in both parties; and the brilliant Ken Hill found opportunity to serve in the PNP as well as the JLP.

In recent times, less noted politicians have crossed party lines and been warmly received by the PNP. The latest is none other than Mr. Lee who, I suppose, expects to be trusted despite his scornful utterances about turncoats like himself.

Turning coat is not necessarily a bad thing, especially when it is based on some stated principle that affects the good order of governance. Unfortunately, the recent cases have all come about because of personality conflicts rather than policy issues of any importance to the electorate. It does appear that without a party coat some of these people are as naked as can be.

I am, etc.,

KEN JONES

http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20060909/letters/letters4.html

[/ QUOTE ]

At the beginning of the letter I saw "Brascoe Lee" and had to blink twice. He's now a member of the PNP?

who's he to talk when he's now aligned with the most destructive force Jamaica has ever had the misfortune of knowing? /forums/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

Tuff Gong
09-19-2006, 12:10 AM
This is how you get things done. This how you debate:

Mon Sep 18, 2006
Drummily residents block roads to get better roads

Residents of Drummily and its environs in Trelawny have blocked over six miles of roadway in the community in protest against poor road conditions.
The residents say the roads have been in a deplorable state for too long and they have become frustrated.

The placard bearing residents say they have made several attempts to meet with their Member of Parliament, Patrick Harris, but to no avail.

The roads were blocked from Deeside to Drummily from as early as six Monday morning forcing motorists and commuters to seek alternative routes.

Trees, derelict vehicles and other debris have been used to block the roads in different sections.

The irate residents have vowed to continue the demonstrations if their grouse is not addressed.

http://www.radiojamaica.com/news/story.php?category=2&amp;story=28336

Blackstar*
09-24-2006, 06:46 AM
Gleaner asst news editor to study investigative journalism in US (http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20060924/lead/lead9.html)
published: Sunday | September 24, 2006

The United States Embassy in Kingston has announced the selection of Robert Hart, assistant news editor with the Gleaner Company to participate in the prestigious International Visitor Leadership Program on investigative journalism. The U.S. State Department, through the International Visitor Leadership Program, sends emergent leaders from all over the world to travel to the United States each year to meet and confer with their professional counterparts and to experience the country and its institutions first-hand.

Mr. Hart, a graduate of the University of the West Indies, Mona, who has been in the field of print journalism for over four years, was senior parliamentary reporter before he assumed the role of assistant news editor last year. Mr. Hart said that he was pleased "to be taking part in the programme as it will give me an opportunity to view first-hand the professional environment for journalism in the U.S. as well as share experiences with colleagues from nations such as Lebanon, Rwanda and Iraq."

Investigative journalism
The three-week multi-city programme, which begins September 28, will afford Mr. Hart and his counterparts from 21 other countries the opportunity to learn about the role of investigative journalism in a democracy including access to information, politics and media ethics. Among his many activities, Mr. Hart will visit television, radio and print media outlets in Washington D.C., and meet with editorial journalists in San Francisco, California. He is also scheduled to meet with representatives of the New York Police Department and court system to discuss the investigative coverage of crime.

Other topics to be examined during the visit include online journalism, media and politics, community television, media watchdogs, impact of technology, journalism as a business and newsrooms at major media outlets.
__________________________________________________ ______________

PNP takes swipe at media (http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/news/html/20060923T170000-0500_113257_OBS_PNP_TAKES_SWIPE_AT_MEDIA.asp)
Sunday, September 24, 2006

Campaign director of the ruling People's National Party, Dr Paul Robertson, yesterday promised to "take an active stance" against what he described as elements of the media that were perceived to be in favour of one party.

Addressing delegates, observers and supporters attending the third day of the party's 68th annual conference, Dr Robertson, who was speaking after the polls closed for the vice-presidential elections, narrowed his swipe to the print media.

"We have to take an active stance against elements of the media. One newspaper appears to have taken a stance as if they are running a campaign for the Jamaica Labour Party," Dr Robertson said.
BStar: This sounds rather alarming.

Some journalists discussed the issue among themselves while others threatened to leave the venue.

At least one senior journalist expressed surprise at the outburst and suggested that the lives of journalists could be placed at risk with the pronouncement.

Recently, at a community meeting in rural Jamaica, an official of the Opposition Jamaica Labour Party attacked the media from a political platform.

Tuff Gong
09-24-2006, 08:09 AM
Yellow Journalism at its best...err worst.


ROPER'S PERSPECTIVE by Garnett Roper


-------------------------------------------------------------------

<u>The polls and the Portia factor</u>

The third of three opinion polls in less than two months has been published. The findings of the respective polls are as different as there are varieties of political opinion in Jamaica. The first poll gave the PM and the PNP a double-digit lead. The JLP analysis said the poll was taken before they took their five-day trip around the island.

The second poll showed that the JLP was four points behind the PNP. The JLP said it was a statistical dead heat. The third poll said that the PNP was only point four of a percentage point ahead. The JLP said that it proved that its work in the field had paid off.

The first issue raised by the poll is whether they are scientific or idiosyncratic. One would think that the gap between the polls needs to be narrowed for all of them to be credible. As it is, all we can say is that if one talks to any three combinations of a thousand people, each they will tell you three different things. It could also be that only one of the polls is accurate or that none of them is to be trusted.

They do however, to be fair, share some important things in common. The first is that though their margins differ all the polls say that the PNP is ahead. This itself is a remarkable achievement for the PNP that has been in Government for more than 17 years and has never enjoyed favourable treatment by the media in general, talk shows in particular or the middle class.

Indeed, it would be fair to say that the money class has devoted significant resources over the decade and a half to unseating the PNP, and still it enjoys a measure of popular support, tenuously so, but favourable nonetheless.

Desperate gamble
The second thing that the opinion polls tell us is that the JLP is not gaining at all. To the extent that the margins between itself and the PNP are being reduced, it is the PNP that has lost ground and not necessarily that the JLP has gained ground. It is of course, to the enormous credit of the JLP that it has found a way to comfort itself and spinning the numbers in its favour despite what they actually say.

The best one can say about that is that it is a change from the past when they use to personalise their misfortunes at the opinion polls by demonising their own leader. Others, however, think that the JLP is living in a fool’ paradise. For example, the JLP has found a clever way of muting good news on behalf of the people into something to be deprecated.

It gambled heavily in its opposition to the Portmore toll road by taking the Government to court, and organising boycotts and protests against the much needed and now well travelled road in the interest of the people of Portmore. It was a political mistake as far as I am concerned for which it will pay a heavy political price. Because the political acting in that manner would have demonstrably shown that it does not know what is good for the people it is seeking an opportunity to represent.

Having gambled so heavily and lost, the JLP has continued its desperate gamble with something like the Sandal’s Whitehouse issue. It has continued to flog a dead horse in the media, despite the findings of both the contractor general and the forensic audit that Sandal’s Whitehouse is value for money, which by the way is the only verdict that matters.

It has persisted, though it has now dropped the epithet Scandal’s Whitehouse, even though its approach to this whole affair has made her Majesty’s Loyal Opposition into the mouthpiece of a single, large private interest; and as such against the interest of the people and of the State. Sandal’s Whitehouse, like the Portmore toll road for Portmore is palpably in the interest of the development of the South Coast of Jamaica and the people that live in that part of Jamaica.


The new employment and the new economic opportunities generated by that fantastic facility is making a world of difference to the economy of the South Coast and the National coffers.

Once again the JLP is seeking to spin its way out, and therefore betraying a tendency to fail to take the intelligence of the electorate seriously. If there is an election called soon the JLP may get away with it, but over time it will become palpably obvious that it has not organised itself in a manner that understands what is in the best interest of the people. The cheap shot politics to which it has committed itself will rob it of a chance to govern the people of this country.

Masses time now
The polls also tell us that Portia is not the factor in so far as the standing of her party, that section of the PNP tells us that she will be. I think that the polls in this respect betray the bias of the pollsters. I think that they are profoundly mistaken. For my part I have made that mistake before, and I make the effort to learn from my mistake.

The PNP internal elections told a very important story: It was made clear then that the Jamaican people know what they want and who they want. They believed that of the three candidates on offer, only one represented a break with the past — past that in their mind was not organised in their interests.

By some logic the PNP in Government, in the mind of the masses, had always postponed their agenda. They were always next in line, after the reading of the next budget. And to the way of thinking of the broad mass of the people represented by a not insubstantial section of the PNP delegates, they were not prepared to wait any longer. It was their time now, and they were not going take any chance on losing their place in the line. Portia, rightly or wrongly, represented their place in the line. It is one thing for the JLP is to downplay that. After all, what else can they do in all the circumstances? It is another thing for pollsters to ignore it or mute it.

The middle class does not wish for Portia to speak for them. The upper classes, according to Don Anderson, by a margin of 17 and 16 per cent are in favour of the JLP over the PNP. It is class cleavage that is going hurt this country very badly. We are back where we were in 1980 where the issue was more class prejudice than ideology. The JLP, though its rhetoric says something else, is positioning itself squarely with the class interest of its former masters.

The people are suspicious of the classes that have disproportionately benefited from political favours down through the years. Portia is not loved because she is PNP but because the masses believe that she is theirs. That is enormous political capital. Any pollster that ignores that will be finding other work to do.

Well, put it this way, the Observer may have space, because Mark Wignall the former pollster, cannot keep it up for much longer. Remember Mark Wignall allowed his despite for PJ Patterson to influence his poll findings, and now he is out of work as a pollster. Others will follow him, if they ignore the Portia factor.

http://www.sunheraldjamaica.com/editorial2.htm

Blackstar*
09-24-2006, 08:34 AM
[ QUOTE ]
The Gleaner newspaper quickly established itself as a sort of opposition to Manley's socialism, branding it communism in sheep's clothing and decidedly earning the ire of the progressive forces.

[/ QUOTE ]

It would be interesting to read articles from back then and see how they compare to today's press.

Tuff Gong
09-24-2006, 08:34 AM
PNP takes swipe at media (http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/news/html/20060923T170000-0500_113257_OBS_PNP_TAKES_SWIPE_AT_MEDIA.asp)
Sunday, September 24, 2006

Campaign director of the ruling People's National Party, Dr Paul Robertson, yesterday promised to "take an active stance" against what he described as elements of the media that were perceived to be in favour of one party.

Addressing delegates, observers and supporters attending the third day of the party's 68th annual conference, Dr Robertson, who was speaking after the polls closed for the vice-presidential elections, narrowed his swipe to the print media.

"We have to take an active stance against elements of the media. One newspaper appears to have taken a stance as if they are running a campaign for the Jamaica Labour Party," Dr Robertson said.
BStar: This sounds rather alarming.

Some journalists discussed the issue among themselves while others threatened to leave the venue.

At least one senior journalist expressed surprise at the outburst and suggested that the lives of journalists could be placed at risk with the pronouncement.

Recently, at a community meeting in rural Jamaica, an official of the Opposition Jamaica Labour Party attacked the media from a political platform.

[/ QUOTE ]

Oliver Clarke: Phone calls at dawn from an angry prime minister
The Desmond Allen Interviews
Desmond Allen
Sunday, April 03, 2005

.....Two years before that - the year that Clarke moved the JNBS to Kingston headquarters from Savanna-la-Mar - Michael Manley's People's National Party (PNP) Government had announced itself democratic socialist and set out on a path to build an egalitarian society.

The centrepiece of the plan was to give power to the people, the voiceless hordes existing in abject poverty, in miserable hovels and in sprawling slums across the land - they who were oppressed by an unthinking ruling class, unflatteringly described as rapacious capitalists by overzealous leftists.

In that same year, 1974, Edward Seaga outfoxed Hugh Lawson Shearer and became leader of the conservative, pro-free enterprise Jamaica Labour Party (JLP) which had the solid backing of the United States. This collision of two events was to set up a fierce ideological struggle in which, at least according to the politicians, Jamaica was divided into the 'progressive forces' - those to the left of centre - and the 'reactionaries' - those to the right of centre. In the middle of it all was the pro-business Gleaner Company.

Last one to leave turn off the lights

Under its editor-in-chief, Hector Wynter, a former chairman of the JLP now turned journalist, The Gleaner newspaper quickly established itself as a sort of opposition to Manley's socialism, branding it communism in sheep's clothing and decidedly earning the ire of the progressive forces. Inside the country, violence - much of it political in nature and origin - raged out of control.

A massive flight of capital and brains sapped the economic energy of the country. Jamaica was now floundering in uncharted waters and on the brink of collapse. One cute graffiti suggested "the last one to leave please turn off the lights". Into this boiling cauldron of despondency and danger stepped Oliver Frederick Clarke in April 1976, aged 32, on a two-year secondment from Jamaican National. Wittingly or unwittingly, Clarke had joined the fray.

Three months later, on June 19, 1976, Manley's Government declared a State of Emergency, ostensibly to stem the violence and loosen its vice-like grip on the island. Clarke arrived at his office on the Gleaner's fifth floor to find a communication from the Competent Authorities - the heads of the police and the army - on his desk.

The document demanded that henceforth, the contents of the newspaper must be submitted to them for vetting before publication. Clarke felt as if he had received a kick in the stomach and he uttered something unprintable. After collecting his thoughts, he phoned Hector Wynter and the other managers and set up a meeting.

Tell them to kiss my.

Leslie Ashenheim was in London vacationing when the phone rang. It was Oliver Clarke calling from North Street, Kingston. He told the Gleaner chairman what had happened in Jamaica and specifically about the communication from the Competent Authorities. To comply meant the end of the free press as they knew it.

Not to comply could mean indefinite detention for Gleaner managers. Sensing his new MD's trepidation, Ashenheim, the old battle axe, was brutal in his response. "Tell them to kiss my (you know what)." Clarke felt as if a weight had lifted off his shoulders. Ashenheim had voiced his own inclination and he got ready to do battle.

"Hector Wynter and I sat down that night and discussed what we would do. We would send them the paper each morning, after it was printed!" Clarke recounts. "We got a few calls from them, but, happily, they did not pursue the matter." Clarke and The Gleaner had won the first round. But the real test was yet to come.

Financially, the Gleaner was in a mess. The company was bleeding red ink and was heavily in debt. On top of that, buying newsprint on which the paper was produced was becoming very problematic. It was necessary to have a licence to import stuff and sometimes the company had to wait up to six months before being allowed to pay for the newsprint, on account of the acute foreign exchange shortage in the country.

Clarke and his team decided that to dig the Gleaner Company out of the hole, they would launch a debenture stock issue. It became the biggest debenture issue in the country's history, with over 2,000 investors buying in, he says. When the debenture was repaid, investors had the option of converting up to 25 per cent to shares in the company.

That gave the company the financial strength it needed and it was able to rid itself of the debt burden, while pulling in a new category of shareholders, many of them from humble circumstances.
"One of the lessons I learnt was that if you are not profitable, you can't print the news you want to. Advertisers can become offended and Government is one of your biggest advertisers. If you have to print something unfavourable to the Government, life could become very uncomfortable for you," Clarke reflects. He believes that many of the current media entities are not profitable and argues that it is difficult to operate a free press if the entity is not viable.

Michael Manley calls at dawn

The financial problems now behind it, The Gleaner stepped up its role as opposition to the Manley Government. Clarke says he was not happy with the quality of the news output, but Wynter had put together a very strong group of opinion writers, including John Hearne, Wilmot Perkins, David D'Costa and Morris Cargill. "Together they wrote some incredibly strong columns critical of the Government that was becoming too heady in its ambitions." And he confesses: "I grew up in that period."

Michael Manley was seething over The Gleaner's seemingly relentless opposition to his Government, and his anger had reached boiling point. One morning, at 5:00 o'clock, he phoned Clarke and let loose on him. Still groggy from not enough sleep, Clarke received an earful of Manley's forceful language. Many other pre-dawn calls from the prime minister were to follow.

"I used to sit there quite terrified as he harangued me about the sins of the day," Clarke discloses now. "But it taught me a very valuable lesson - that if you are going to lead a newspaper, you have to read that paper and be in a position to deal with complaints. I had to learn how to deal with the prime minister's complaints.

The mistake I later made was not to make the effort to maintain the communication between The Gleaner and the senior politicians in the country. If media is going to have problems with people, it is important that both sides talk to each other. But of course, I was young at the time." It wasn't over yet.

Next time! Next time!

On a particular Monday morning, the Cabinet meeting was in an angry mood. The Gleaner was the hot topic of discussion and the unflattering language being used to describe the paper was not English.

Manley ended the meeting early, and in a sombre tone, made the unprecedented announcement that he would lead a protest march on the Gleaner Company! In broiling sun, the marchers meandered through the streets of the capital city and by the time they reached 7 North Street, home of The Gleaner, their numbers had swelled far beyond the relative handful of Cabinet ministers.

The Gleaner's gate was uncharacteristically shut in the middle of the day and police kept a nervous watch over the demonstrators. An open-back flatbed truck was transformed into a stage. From that makeshift platform, Manley, in dramatic style issued a solemn, chilling warning to The Gleaner: "Next time! Next time!" That was immediately interpreted to mean that after the PNP had won the coming 1980 elections, The Gleaner would be dealt with decisively.

As it turned out, the PNP was trounced by Seaga's JLP in the October 30, 1980 general elections and a conservative Government came to power. The Gleaner settled back into its customary run-of-the-mill pace and Clarke resumed his principal role of managing director and now chairman of the Gleaner Company, as well as its largest shareholder. And to think he had twice refused the job when Ashenheim had first offered it to him!

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&amp;q=next+time+nextime%2C+jamaica+observ er

Tuff Gong
09-24-2006, 08:39 AM
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
The Gleaner newspaper quickly established itself as a sort of opposition to Manley's socialism, branding it communism in sheep's clothing and decidedly earning the ire of the progressive forces.

[/ QUOTE ]

It would be interesting to read articles from back then and see how they compare to today's press.

[/ QUOTE ]

They are available.
I used to read the all the newspapers daily.
The articles were beautifully written and to the point.

The main writers for the gleaner were:
Wilmot Perkins
Dawn Rich
Morris Cargil
John Herne

They were journalists and beat writers, not mere political hacks masquerading as journalists.

Blackstar*
09-24-2006, 08:39 AM
I guess he's waiting to become PM so when he says something, things get done. /forums/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

[ QUOTE ]
The placard bearing residents say they have made several attempts to meet with their Member of Parliament, Patrick Harris, but to no avail.

[/ QUOTE ]
This is a a damned shame. /forums/images/graemlins/70361-embarassed.gif

Tuff Gong
09-24-2006, 08:47 AM
[ QUOTE ]
I guess he's waiting to become PM so when he says something, things get done. /forums/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

[ QUOTE ]
The placard bearing residents say they have made several attempts to meet with their Member of Parliament, Patrick Harris, but to no avail.

[/ QUOTE ]
This is a a damned shame. /forums/images/graemlins/70361-embarassed.gif

[/ QUOTE ]

Well PSM has given every MHR or public official an excuse to do nothing.....aah doan have di powa, I am not the PM.

Dr.Dudd
09-24-2006, 09:58 AM
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
The Gleaner newspaper quickly established itself as a sort of opposition to Manley's socialism, branding it communism in sheep's clothing and decidedly earning the ire of the progressive forces.

[/ QUOTE ]

It would be interesting to read articles from back then and see how they compare to today's press.

[/ QUOTE ]
Go to the Gleaner archives. Reading it there will remind you of some of the posters posters on here. Totally lacking of objectivity,especially at the time they were the only print media for most of the time.
Not to mention staged pictures published as real.
The recent publishing of the pics after the military take over in thailand reminds me of those staged pictures.

Tuff Gong
09-24-2006, 10:34 AM
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
The Gleaner newspaper quickly established itself as a sort of opposition to Manley's socialism, branding it communism in sheep's clothing and decidedly earning the ire of the progressive forces.

[/ QUOTE ]

It would be interesting to read articles from back then and see how they compare to today's press.

[/ QUOTE ]
Go to the Gleaner archives. Reading it there will remind you of some of the posters posters on here. Totally lacking of objectivity,especially at the time they were the only print media for most of the time.
Not to mention staged pictures published as real.
The recent publishing of the pics after the military take over in thailand reminds me of those staged pictures.

[/ QUOTE ]

Give us some specifics.
What posters?
What comment(s) did each make and on what?
What pictures?

So you are holding yourself up to be what?
You are making bold statements about whom Phantom Members, Phantom Posts, Phantom Pictures?

Dr.Dudd
09-24-2006, 12:02 PM
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
The Gleaner newspaper quickly established itself as a sort of opposition to Manley's socialism, branding it communism in sheep's clothing and decidedly earning the ire of the progressive forces.

[/ QUOTE ]

It would be interesting to read articles from back then and see how they compare to today's press.

[/ QUOTE ]
Go to the Gleaner archives. Reading it there will remind you of some of the posters posters on here. Totally lacking of objectivity,especially at the time they were the only print media for most of the time.
Not to mention staged pictures published as real.
The recent publishing of the pics after the military take over in thailand reminds me of those staged pictures.

[/ QUOTE ]

Give us some specifics.
What posters?
What comment(s) did each make and on what?
What pictures?

So you are holding yourself up to be what?
You are making bold statements about whom Phantom Members, Phantom Posts, Phantom Pictures?

[/ QUOTE ]
Mi tro rackstone ina hag pen,the wan weh ball out a him it lick. Mi tro mi cawn mi no call no fowl.

Tuff Gong
09-24-2006, 12:06 PM
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
The Gleaner newspaper quickly established itself as a sort of opposition to Manley's socialism, branding it communism in sheep's clothing and decidedly earning the ire of the progressive forces.

[/ QUOTE ]

It would be interesting to read articles from back then and see how they compare to today's press.

[/ QUOTE ]
Go to the Gleaner archives. Reading it there will remind you of some of the posters posters on here. Totally lacking of objectivity,especially at the time they were the only print media for most of the time.
Not to mention staged pictures published as real.
The recent publishing of the pics after the military take over in thailand reminds me of those staged pictures.

[/ QUOTE ]

Give us some specifics.
What posters?
What comment(s) did each make and on what?
What pictures?

So you are holding yourself up to be what?
You are making bold statements about whom Phantom Members, Phantom Posts, Phantom Pictures?

[/ QUOTE ]
Mi tro rackstone ina hag pen,the wan weh ball out a him it lick. Mi tro mi cawn mi no call no fowl.

[/ QUOTE ]

Okay Swine if that what you call yourself because what you have said applied most to you than any poster on this board.

I am happy you have supplied to the board your full name so from hence forth I will legally be able to you:

Dr. Dumb Hog!

Dr.Dudd
09-24-2006, 04:09 PM
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
The Gleaner newspaper quickly established itself as a sort of opposition to Manley's socialism, branding it communism in sheep's clothing and decidedly earning the ire of the progressive forces.

[/ QUOTE ] /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif

It would be interesting to read articles from back then and see how they compare to today's press.

[/ QUOTE ]
Go to the Gleaner archives. Reading it there will remind you of some of the posters posters on here. Totally lacking of objectivity,especially at the time they were the only print media for most of the time.
Not to mention staged pictures published as real.
The recent publishing of the pics after the military take over in thailand reminds me of those staged pictures.

[/ QUOTE ]

Give us some specifics.
What posters?
What comment(s) did each make and on what?
What pictures?

So you are holding yourself up to be what?
You are making bold statements about whom Phantom Members, Phantom Posts, Phantom Pictures?

[/ QUOTE ]
Mi tro rackstone ina hag pen,the wan weh ball out a him it lick. Mi tro mi cawn mi no call no fowl.

[/ QUOTE ]

Okay Swine if that what you call yourself because what you have said applied most to you than any poster on this board.

I am happy you have supplied to the board your full name so from hence forth I will legally be able to you:

Dr. Dumb Hog!

[/ QUOTE ] /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif /forums/images/graemlins/704555_dwl.gif

Tuff Gong
10-08-2006, 04:47 PM
This is what happen when you chat too much Jamaica:

<u>Article #1</u>

JLP links with Sonia Christie
As the Trafigura Beheer scandal gathers momentum, information has surfaced linking FirstCaribbean International Bank senior executive, Sonia Christie, to the Opposition Jamaica Labour Party.

The Sunday Herald has learnt that Christie was a member of Opposition Member of Parliament for North Central Clarendon Pearnel Charles’ finance committee in the 2002 general elections.

During the period leading up to the elections, she attended several meetings at Charles’ house.
Since then, sources say, Christie continues to be politically active. She is related to Charles’ cousin, Fitz Christie, who is the deputy mayor of Falmouth. She is also said to be related to Charles’ sister, Lorna Golding, wife of Opposition Leader Bruce Golding.

In a telephone interview yesterday, the deputy mayor declined to say if Sonia is his wife.
“I’m not confirming anything,” Christie said.


Threats
Meanwhile, Police Commissioner Lucius Thomas confirmed yesterday that the police have initiated investigations into the alleged breach of the Banking Act.

“Senior officers from the Fraud Sqaud and the Criminal Investigations Branch have been alerted to look into the matter, Thomas said yesterday.

Section 45 of the Act states that, “no official of any bank and no person who, by reason of his capacity or office has by any means access to the records of the bank, or any registers, correspondence or material with regard to the account of any customer of that bank shall, while his employment in or as the case may be, his professional relationship with the bank continues or after the termination thereof, give, divulge, or reveal any information regarding the money or other relevant particulars of the account of that customer.”

It is not clear if Christie, who was sent on three days leave to facilitate the probe into how confidential information on a People’s National Party account was leaked to the Jamaica Labour Party, has been implicated.

Word from the JLP camp is that the party was busy trying to ferret out additional information relating to other accounts where large deposits were made on behalf of the PNP.

Apart from the investigations, the scandal has sparked more problems for the bank. Yesterday, the Sunday Herald was reliably informed that employees of bank are currently working in fear after receiving threats from persons believed to be political enforcers linked to the PNP.

Account closed
Information leaked to the JLP indicated that the ruling PNP received $31 million from the Dutch-based oil trader Trafigura Beheer between September 6 and 10, just days before its contract with the state-owned Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica (PCJ) was renewed. These funds were used the finance the PNP’s 68th annual conference, which attracted over 30,000 supporters.

The donation was made to an account captioned CCOC, which was opened to raise funds for Information and Development Minister Colin Campbell when he entered representational politics in 1992. The account, which was not closed after Campbell was elected, is currently being used to mobilise funding for the PNP’s election campaign.

Last week, the PNP closed the account noting that donors no longer had the confidence that their contributions to the account would be kept confidential. Campbell, however, supported the bank’s release that depositors need not worry about the confidentiality of their transactions with the bank because of the current “one–off” breach.

http://www.jamaicans.com/forums/newreply...part=3&amp;vc=1 (http://www.jamaicans.com/forums/newreply.php?Cat=0&amp;Board=11&amp;Number=19684203&amp;page=4 &amp;what=showflat&amp;fpart=3&amp;vc=1)

<u>Article #2</u>

Blair threatened
By Kimmo Matthews

The police are probing reports that the head of the Peace Management Initiative (PMI), Bishop Herro Blair, was threatened.

Police Commissioner Lucius Thomas declined to give details, but admitted that the police were aware of a letter sent to the bishop accusing him of acting in a partisan way and warning him that something could happen to him.

The Sunday Herald learnt that the political ombudsman received the letter after he expressed his disagreement with a move by Jamaica Labour Party dons in the Mountain View area to put up barriers to separate communities. All the contents in the letter were not ascertained, but sources said that derogatory terms were used to describe the bishop and threats were issued.

Speaking from overseas yesterday, Bishop Blair neither confirmed nor denied the allegations. He said, however, that he was not in the island and would not speak on the matter until he returned.

“I am not in the island at this time and I will not make any comment until I return in a few days,” Blair said.

A few weeks ago, the PMI, as part of its efforts to reduce political tension in West Central St. Andrew, carried out a peace march, which failed miserably as tensions rose between political representatives.

Jamaica Labour Party representative, Andrew Holness, at the time refused to shake the hand of the bishop and efforts to get the representatives from the two major political parties to walk side by side in the warring community were unsuccessful.

The tour started on Cling Cling Avenue where JLP supporters held placards bearing uncomplimentary statements about PNP representative, Patrick Roberts.

Holness, when approached by Bishop Blair, refused to shake his hand. He charged that the PMI was not dealing with breaches of the Political Code of Conduct by his opponent.

The bishop, in an interview with reporters, said that this was his worst experience at a peace initiative in his four years as political ombudsman.

The political ombudsman subsequently moved his tour to North West St. Andrew where there were fears that political violence was about to explode in the community of Marverly. Mr. Holness has since apologised to the bishop.

http://www.sunheraldjamaica.com/coverstory3.htm

evanovitch
10-08-2006, 05:03 PM
[ QUOTE ]

This is what happen when you chat too much Jamaica:

<u>Article #1</u>

JLP links with Sonia Christie
As the Trafigura Beheer scandal gathers momentum, information has surfaced linking FirstCaribbean International Bank senior executive, Sonia Christie, to the Opposition Jamaica Labour Party.

The Sunday Herald has learnt that Christie was a member of Opposition Member of Parliament for North Central Clarendon Pearnel Charles’ finance committee in the 2002 general elections.

During the period leading up to the elections, she attended several meetings at Charles’ house.
Since then, sources say, Christie continues to be politically active. She is related to Charles’ cousin, Fitz Christie, who is the deputy mayor of Falmouth. She is also said to be related to Charles’ sister, Lorna Golding, wife of Opposition Leader Bruce Golding.

In a telephone interview yesterday, the deputy mayor declined to say if Sonia is his wife.
“I’m not confirming anything,” Christie said.


Threats
Meanwhile, Police Commissioner Lucius Thomas confirmed yesterday that the police have initiated investigations into the alleged breach of the Banking Act.

“Senior officers from the Fraud Sqaud and the Criminal Investigations Branch have been alerted to look into the matter, Thomas said yesterday.

Section 45 of the Act states that, “no official of any bank and no person who, by reason of his capacity or office has by any means access to the records of the bank, or any registers, correspondence or material with regard to the account of any customer of that bank shall, while his employment in or as the case may be, his professional relationship with the bank continues or after the termination thereof, give, divulge, or reveal any information regarding the money or other relevant particulars of the account of that customer.”

It is not clear if Christie, who was sent on three days leave to facilitate the probe into how confidential information on a People’s National Party account was leaked to the Jamaica Labour Party, has been implicated.

Word from the JLP camp is that the party was busy trying to ferret out additional information relating to other accounts where large deposits were made on behalf of the PNP.

Apart from the investigations, the scandal has sparked more problems for the bank. Yesterday, the Sunday Herald was reliably informed that employees of bank are currently working in fear after receiving threats from persons believed to be political enforcers linked to the PNP.

Account closed
Information leaked to the JLP indicated that the ruling PNP received $31 million from the Dutch-based oil trader Trafigura Beheer between September 6 and 10, just days before its contract with the state-owned Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica (PCJ) was renewed. These funds were used the finance the PNP’s 68th annual conference, which attracted over 30,000 supporters.

The donation was made to an account captioned CCOC, which was opened to raise funds for Information and Development Minister Colin Campbell when he entered representational politics in 1992. The account, which was not closed after Campbell was elected, is currently being used to mobilise funding for the PNP’s election campaign.

Last week, the PNP closed the account noting that donors no longer had the confidence that their contributions to the account would be kept confidential. Campbell, however, supported the bank’s release that depositors need not worry about the confidentiality of their transactions with the bank because of the current “one–off” breach.

http://www.jamaicans.com/forums/newreply...part=3&amp;vc=1 (http://www.jamaicans.com/forums/newreply.php?Cat=0&amp;Board=11&amp;Number=19684203&amp;page=4 &amp;what=showflat&amp;fpart=3&amp;vc=1)

<u>Article #2</u>

Blair threatened
By Kimmo Matthews

The police are probing reports that the head of the Peace Management Initiative (PMI), Bishop Herro Blair, was threatened.

Police Commissioner Lucius Thomas declined to give details, but admitted that the police were aware of a letter sent to the bishop accusing him of acting in a partisan way and warning him that something could happen to him.

The Sunday Herald learnt that the political ombudsman received the letter after he expressed his disagreement with a move by Jamaica Labour Party dons in the Mountain View area to put up barriers to separate communities. All the contents in the letter were not ascertained, but sources said that derogatory terms were used to describe the bishop and threats were issued.

Speaking from overseas yesterday, Bishop Blair neither confirmed nor denied the allegations. He said, however, that he was not in the island and would not speak on the matter until he returned.

“I am not in the island at this time and I will not make any comment until I return in a few days,” Blair said.

A few weeks ago, the PMI, as part of its efforts to reduce political tension in West Central St. Andrew, carried out a peace march, which failed miserably as tensions rose between political representatives.

Jamaica Labour Party representative, Andrew Holness, at the time refused to shake the hand of the bishop and efforts to get the representatives from the two major political parties to walk side by side in the warring community were unsuccessful.

The tour started on Cling Cling Avenue where JLP supporters held placards bearing uncomplimentary statements about PNP representative, Patrick Roberts.

Holness, when approached by Bishop Blair, refused to shake his hand. He charged that the PMI was not dealing with breaches of the Political Code of Conduct by his opponent.

The bishop, in an interview with reporters, said that this was his worst experience at a peace initiative in his four years as political ombudsman.

The political ombudsman subsequently moved his tour to North West St. Andrew where there were fears that political violence was about to explode in the community of Marverly. Mr. Holness has since apologised to the bishop.

http://www.sunheraldjamaica.com/coverstory3.htm

[/ QUOTE ]

the lady's action is questionable as it relates to har job...but den again, is not like di info is wrong..an which is worse...weh seh do or weh dem do

an did the bank fill out the forms reporting this to the powers regarding ova 10000 dolla deposits

so is not dat she do it..but is dat she a labourite an do it...mek dem gweh wid dem fawt

so dem a shoot di messenger but mek di message, di troot , awful an illegal as it is , go fawud unpunished...but punish di messenger

an dem a go use har as di example fi alll who dare to mek wat go awn in di dark come to light, RATHER , than stop do wrangniss eena dark /forums/images/graemlins/70400-talktohand.gif
an as fi di parson, him need a reality chek

big big parson an him a behave juss like Holness...

so Holness show him lak of broughtupsy BUT him still come bak an offa him hand...

YET di big Parson who preach forgive, and setting di example, and turning di odda cheek, not to mention his position as building bridges, him coulden draw pon him teachings an offa him hand

no, him coulden cause him was tooooo self important

dis why all dem initiatives tun out to be a big joke

cause wen it come down to it, di personality of the person, cannot be subdued to the right thing to do

him need fi go eena him prayer closet and pray bout him lapse of humility and teaching by example

gweh wid him

Tuff Gong
10-08-2006, 05:23 PM
Pastor Blair is not an honest broker. I will not frown on the threats, in fact I would be shocked if he was not threatened. For Andrew Holiness I would be willing take action against the Pastor myself, the point I am trying to make is, Pastor Blair is not acting in keeping with the objectives of one who wants lasting peace in Jamaica, he is more about pomp and circumstance than about getting things right.

Here are a couple of opinions of other on the Blair/Holiness issue. (It is also worthy to note that Mr. Holiness in the same time frame proffered his own hand but it was refused by the Pastor/Peacemaker/Man of God, who then went on to labba im mout bout Andrew.)


<u>Article #1</u>

Fight the good fight

Saturday, October 07, 2006

Dear Editor,
The recent position by Mr Andrew Holness on political troubles in his constituency left me in a pensive mood. I was quick at condemning him for his seemingly unhelpful position on the matter. I later came to agree with him.

Can one seriously work to solve the problem of political violence while your opponent has several character question marks over his head? Can one seriously address the problems by walking with this individual in a peace walk? Does this not indeed give this person legitimacy?

As a resident of West Central St Andrew, I am backing Mr Holness on his position. It makes absolutely no sense to solve the recent spectre of political violence by touring sections of the constituency with a person who in my mind is grossly unfit for representational politics.
The matter should be left in the hands of the police who I sincerely hope will be unbiased in the proper execution of their duties.
Mr Holness, keep fighting for us decent Jamaicans who abhor hypocrisy.

Mike James
Olympic Way
Kingston 11
[email protected]

http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/letters/html/20061006T220000-0500_113718_OBS_FIGHT_THE_GOOD_FIGHT.asp

<u>Article #2</u>

Bishop Blair should offer to resign

Saturday, October 07, 2006

Dear Editor,
Bishop Herro Blair is a respected man with talent that can be most useful to this country. However, his credibility has been somewhat tarnished by the recent Holness incident in which he refused to accept an apology for a perceived insult to himself. I seriously think that he should at least offer his resignation as political ombudsman responsible for holding an even scale for the two contending parties.

When the minister of tourism openly declared her design to establish a political garrison in St Ann, the Farquharson Institute complained to the ombudsman about this outrageous statement. In response, he had talks with the minister and her supporters and, without any reference to the complainant, declared that the minister had merely displayed exuberance and had in fact later apologised.

This, he said, was sufficient. On the other hand, when Holness confessed exuberance and offered him an almost immediate apology he refused even to take the young man's hand. Instead, he strongly protested and threatened to have him disgraced in the eyes of the public. This reveals a bias that should not be seen in any ombudsman.

I respectfully suggest that even if the laws of the land do not require it, Christian principles demand that the Bishop should seek forgiveness or cease to be a "judge and divider" over political issues.

Ken Jones
[email protected]

http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/letters/h..._TO_RESIGN_.asp (http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/letters/html/20061006T220000-0500_113719_OBS_BISHOP_BLAIR_SHOULD_OFFER_TO_RESIG N_.asp)