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  1. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    742

    Re: Post Questions to US Immigration Attorney Nadine Brown

    Hello Ms Brown,

    My sister lost her permanent resident card, when she goes to the INS office, will she be able at the same time file for her citizenship or do she have to wait until she receive the replacement card?

  2. #22

    Re: Post Questions to US Immigration Attorney Nadine Brown

    Jamaica_dreamin,

    Can a child with an Immigrant visa (Permanent Resident card) leave the US to go to school abroad? Yes, and s/he can remain outside the US for up to 6 months at a time, but I would caution the person about doing this if they plan to apply for citizenship down the line. If you can't make it back within 6 months, then you could end up losing your residency and/or may not qualify for citizenship because citizenship requires physical presence in the United States for a period of at least 2 and 1/2 years of the last 5 years. Better to apply for a re-entry permit BEFORE leaving for school IF and only if you will be gone for longer than six months...

  3. #23

    Re: Post Questions to US Immigration Attorney Nadine Brown

    Englan Girl,

    For a British national to marry a US citizen and get a green card to stay permanently in US, the couple will need to decide where they will marry first. The location of marriage will determine which process will be initiated. If married in England then Englan Girl will have to stay there until she can get the appropriate visa at the US Embassy in London...if they are in the US and she is visiting, then she can apply for residency here in US by filing the appropriate applications and filing fees. The process can take six months to several years. It all depends really on where the marriage takes place and where the non-US resident is physically. You may need more detailed information and a consultation.

  4. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Up deh so
    Posts
    7,982

    Re: Post Questions to US Immigration Attorney Nadine Brown

    [ QUOTE ]
    Ivoree,

    Your question is whether purchasing property in Florida will facilitate getting a work permit. Well, you can purchase property in Florida or anywhere for that matter as an investor, but it will not get you a work permit. A work permit also called an Employment Authorization Document is a benefit of already being in the process of applying for residency. Residency is gained either through sponsorship by an employer or immediate relative family member. Unfortunately, buying property doesn't give you eligibility for getting documents, only a nice place to visit on holiday.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    That is what I am aiming for, residency. An Immigration Lawyer I am currently with has advised me my family cannot do the sponsorship. But mentioned if I had $60,000 USD to invest it would help me. OR if I was working in certain professions.

    I will have a nice lot to pitch my tent on in the meantime until I start the actual building of a home. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/70384-praying.gif[/img] Just have to make sure it is a lizzard proof tent! [img]/forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif[/img]

    Thanks for the insight!
    If you feel a little useless, offended or depressed. Always remember that <span style="font-weight: bold">YOU</span> were once the fastest &amp; most victorious little sperm out of millions!

  5. #25

    Re: Post Questions to US Immigration Attorney Nadine Brown

    Ms. Brown,
    Can you please explain the US immigration 245(i). What does it mean? Who qualifies under it? Is/was there a timeline for applicants under 245(i)? How does the 245(i) and the Supplement A to the form I-485 relate. As much info that you can supply and in layman terms. Thanks! [img]/forums/images/graemlins/notworthy.gif[/img]

  6. #26

    Re: Post Questions to US Immigration Attorney Nadine Brown

    Wha'pon Coolmugs?
    Wow, you have quite a few questions. The process is not faster or slower for people with attorneys. The only difference is whether the appropriate papers are filed. And sometimes, only an expert can know because the US immigration process can be complicated. An attorney can make sure the papers are properly completed. Errors by lay people is what ends up complicating or delaying the paperwork.

    The filing fees for Immigration paperwork can be found at www.uscis.gov. For the average family based case, the Immigration fees can be about US$700-$800. Paying an attorney will be in addition to those fees and can run in my area about US$1800-3000. It varies and may be case specific.
    You can check the progress or status of your case on line at www.uscis.gov/case status, altough there are some cases at the local offices which are not posted on-line.
    If you need further information or assistance or would like to know about my specific services, contact me directly by e-mail or phone.

  7. #27
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Up deh so
    Posts
    7,982

    Re: Post Questions to US Immigration Attorney Nadine Brown

    Sorry Ms. Brown, me again...

    I've been told if marrying someone in the Military the process of becoming a US Citizen is faster. Is this true? [img]/forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif[/img]
    If you feel a little useless, offended or depressed. Always remember that <span style="font-weight: bold">YOU</span> were once the fastest &amp; most victorious little sperm out of millions!

  8. #28
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    running for it
    Posts
    329

    Re: Post Questions to US Immigration Attorney Nadine Brown

    thanx will do that
    Happy New Year I'm such a happy camper

  9. #29

    Re: Post Questions to US Immigration Attorney Nadine Brown

    Coolbeans,

    It will not be too difficult to file for the other two children later, but the US citizen will have to do it as a step parent because if the father does it when he becomes a resident it could take 4 to 5 years. Easy and quick if step parent does filing.
    The fiance will get to come to the US once the K-1 fiance petition is issued at the Embassy. This may take 4 to 9 months after the US citizen has filed the petition and it is approved.
    The fiance's children will be considered K-2 visa entrants and they should travel with him. It is a package deal. If for some reason they are not able to come right away, there is a way they can come six months later, but better and less complicated if they travel all together at once.

  10. #30

    Re: Post Questions to US Immigration Attorney Nadine Brown

    Hello 7777,

    Your friend may regret not every applying for naturalization. Membership has its privileges such as no deportation unless you commit acts of treason. Better to have applied for naturalization when eligible than to delay. Permanent Residents can and do get deported frequently for because of their own negligence and past criminal activities.
    Not paying child support would be an automatic disqualifier for naturalization but does not lead to deportation. The other charges is what I would be concerned about...you say domestic, what does that mean? If it is related to domestic violence then yes, convictions for domestic violence, stalking crimes, etc. are a grounds for deportation. Anything else may be questionable, but there are crimes that will result in deportation regardless of the level of crime. He definitely needs an immigration attorney. Wish him luck!

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