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Thread: Herb Guide

  1. #1
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    Herb Guide

    Nothing beats the flavor and aroma of freshly cut herbs. They are easy to grow, even in the smallest of gardens or on a window sill. No patience for gardening? The supermarkets carry a large selection of fresh herbs in the produce section. Fresh herbs will add a touch of summer to all your recipes.

    <span style="font-weight: bold">Basil</span>

    Fresh basil has a pungent flavor that is very common and popular. Use it in tomato sauces, pesto sauces, vinegar, and with lamb, fish, poultry, pasta, rice, tomatoes and Italian dishes.

    Parsley

    This fresh-flavored herb, slightly green and piny, is more commonly used as a flavoring and as a garnish. Use to flavor grilled meat, poultry, soups, omelets, mashed potatoes, and salads. It may be used in herbal butters and vinegars or as a garnish.

    Oregano

    This herb has a strong flavor and aroma. Used to flavor tomato sauces, vinegar, omelets, quiche, bread, marinated vegetables, beef, poultry, black beans, and pizza.

    Cilantro

    Use in Asian and Mexican cooking or as a garnish. Popular in salsa, guacamole, Thai peanut sauce, enchiladas, and chicken dishes. Cilantro is also called coriander and has a pungent fragrance.

    Tarragon

    This aromatic herb, with narrow, pointed, dark green leaves, is known for its distinctive anise-like flavor. Use to flavor vinegars, herbal butter, shellfish, mayonnaise, sour cream dressing, poultry, turkey, mushrooms, broccoli, and rice. Use the fresh leaves in salads, tartar sauce, and French dressing.

    Rosemary

    Rosemary's silver-green, needle-shaped leaves are highly aromatic and their flavor is one of both lemon and pine. Use for poultry, lamb, veal, pork, and tomato dishes, stews, soups, and vegetables. Also good finely chopped in breads and custards.

    Sage

    This slightly bitter and musty-mint tasting herb has narrow, oval, and gray-green leaves. Use in chicken and turkey stuffing and to flavor sausages.

    Dill

    This tangy and pungent flavored herb is known for its feathery green leaves. Use to flavor fish and rice, sprinkle over potatoes and cucumbers and add to sauces and dips.

    Chives

    This mild onion flavor herb has slender, vivid green, and hollow stem. Use as topping for baked potatoes, fish &amp; poultry, and vegetables. It can be used as a substitute for green onions or as a garnish. It is also great in soups and sauces.

    Thyme

    This herb has pungent minty, light-lemon scent. Use in stews, soups, casseroles, meatloaf, stuffing, marinades, and vegetables.

    Mint

    This aromatic herb has a sweet smell and a cool aftertaste. Use to make teas, beverages, and desserts. It can also be used as a garnish. It is also popular in Indian cuisine.
    source

  2. #2
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    Re: Herb Guide

    This is a good list Twiney and helpful as I try to continue to reduce the sodium in my diet.

    I think basil is my personal favorite. I am quite the fan of cilantro, rosemary, and sage too. I don't stick to just one herb at a time but these have tastes that offset my desire for salt.

    I hate tarragon though with a passion. I see your description says it has an anise flavor. That probably explains why I detest Asian dishes that contain five star anise.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit, but wisdom is knowing not to put it in a fruit salad.

  3. #3
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    Re: Herb Guide


    Thanks for the good list, Twiney. It will be helpful for lots of people.
    Trying to describe a herb is an almost impossible task. But this comes close.

    Tulip, tarragon isn't for everyone.
    I used to love it in a herb butter made with wine vinegar and butter. It was great with lobster or stout-flavoured fish. But you have to use it sparingly, and of course not at all if you hate it .

    When listing the uses of mint, PLEASE don't forget TABOULEH, in which it is one of the main ingredients!

    Has anybody posted a recipe for it lately? If not, I can give you my own if you like..

    Here in Accra there is one outdoor veggie shop where one can buy fresh locally-grown mint, parsley, coriander, basil and dill at resonable prices. Somtimes I have to call ahead to ask Madam to save some dill for me.

    Nearby to her, fresh curry leaves (Curry Patta) are available very cheaply. These grow on huge shade trees, are very strong-flavoured (another acquired taste..) and just 6-12 of these little leaves are enough for a dish!!

    I finely chop all these except the curry leaves and combine them with finely chopped spring onions, a few drops of lime juice, a level teaspoon of Dijon mustard, freshly ground black pepper and hardly any salt, 3 capfuls of extra virgin olive oil, finely chop a hard-boiled egg, mix it all together and make a sandwich of it (or two) with the whole wheat bread from the bakery a block away. Sheer yumminess and the greatest immune booster in the world!
    Neither youth nor old age is contagious.
    The only place you can find something is where it is.

  4. #4
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    Re: Herb Guide

    Sounds good MsPeaches. I have never had boiled eggs in it before, but it could definitely see how they could work well with the flavors. (I'm relatively certain I've never had curry leaves in it.)

    Also, I have wheat bulgur mixed in instead of making a sandwich with bread. I can really go for some right now lol.

    I did not know it was so good for you but surely am glad to hear it.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit, but wisdom is knowing not to put it in a fruit salad.

  5. #5
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    Re: Herb Guide

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Tulip</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I hate tarragon though with a passion. I see your description says it has an anise flavor. That probably explains why I detest Asian dishes that contain five star anise. </div></div>

    grandma2 educated me on the deliciousness of fish steamed with start anise in its seasoning. anise flavour and fish seem to go well together.
    <span style="font-style: italic">All Glory to The Hypnotoad!</span>

  6. #6
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    Re: Herb Guide

    Tulip

    The thing I described wasn't my recipe for Tabouleh, but for boiled egg &amp; herb sandwiches, and I don't include curry leaves in either of them either. Curry leaves are for Indian dishes. If you'd like my recipe for Tabouleh the way I make it here, here goes:

    TABOULEH

    1) Place 1/2 cup of Bulgur (here we use what's called 'Wheat') into a 2-cup measuring cup. Pour 2 cups of boiling water over it and set your timer for 10 minutes. (mine is on my cellphone) Set aside and wait for it to go off. When it goes off while you're chopping, drain in a sieve, let it cool and squeeze all the extra water out of it. Set aside again.

    2) Meanwhile, FINELY chop (or you can again use a food processor)

    about 6 spring onions,
    about a cup of fresh mint leaves (strip them backwards from the tips of the stems),
    2 cups of fresh parsley (minus tough stems but before you chop it),
    about 1/4 cup of basil leaves.
    1/4 cup fresh coriander (optional)

    3) Place these chopped herbs (they will look much smaller now.) into a medium-sized mixing bowl and set aside.

    4) Chop 1 big or 2 small tomatoes quite small and add them to the bowl. Add the cooled wheat and set aside.

    DRESSING

    Juice lemons until you have 1/2 cup of lemon juice.
    Stir in 1/2 to 1 tsp salt and plenty of freshly-groind black pepper. Stir well to dissolve the salt.
    Add almost 1/2 cup of Extra Virgin olive oil and stir well.

    5) Pour the dressing over the other stuff and stir very well to blend
    .
    VOILA!!!
    You can't get our fresh local whole wheat bread there, but get the best you can and spread it with TABOULEH and you'll see it was worth all the work.

    This recipe makes about 3-4 cups of Tabouleh, and it will keep for about a week or slightly more in the fridge. Don't try freezing it, please.

    Tabouleh contains: Vitamins A, B, C, E and K and minerals potassium, calcium, magnesium, selenium and iron (and of course sodium from the salt). Plus fresh enzymes to make you feel great and digest your food well. A terrific immune-system booster.and a little goes a long way.
    Neither youth nor old age is contagious.
    The only place you can find something is where it is.

  7. #7
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    Re: Herb Guide

    Ok, that sounds more like what I'm used to MissPeaches.

    I am disappointed to hear it will last up to a week in the fridge because that takes away my excuse for wolfing it down so fast lol.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit, but wisdom is knowing not to put it in a fruit salad.

  8. #8
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    Re: Herb Guide



    <span style="font-weight: bold">DWL!!! </span>

    My helper here made a new batch yesterday. This evening I was having some with some Joloff Rice and I said to myself, &quot;Hmmmmmmm... why does this taste like turpentine - bitter and strange!&quot;

    And then I caught the flake of Oregano by itself and said, &quot;OOOOOOOHHHH NOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!&quot;

    She doesn't eveen eat the stuff so why change MY recipe?!
    Neither youth nor old age is contagious.
    The only place you can find something is where it is.

  9. #9
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    Re: Herb Guide

    Off with her head lol.

    Seriously though, it's just wrong to expect one taste and get something else. Now I like oregano in tomato dishes but still you already said you have trouble finding good oregano so that makes it even worse that she tried to sneak it in.

    Maybe she actually likes it and said she didn't to try to find some common ground with you and thought she could convert you by sneaking some in.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit, but wisdom is knowing not to put it in a fruit salad.

  10. #10
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    Re: Herb Guide

    cilantro is definitely an acquired taste.
    When Miley Cyrus gets naked and licks a hammer it's *art* and *music* - when I do it I'm *wasted* and *have to leave the hardware store*.

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