• Login:

Welcome to the Community Forum.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.

Page 9 of 9 FirstFirst ... 789
Results 81 to 81 of 81
  1. #81
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    nymfc
    Posts
    4,737

    Re: More on Buddhism..Becoming a Buddhist

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Silent_River</div><div class="ubbcode-body">
    Upon further thinking and once again comparison, I find similarities. In essence, we believe that each human being has that capability of living to their fullest God given potential as a human being. In a way, it is finding out who you are in Christ and then growing and walking in that knowledge on a daily basis. Christians actually means 'little christs', and this is so because one can see that one is adhering to the words of Jesus and following his teachings. That is how a group of believers got the name 'christians' anyways and it has been so ever since.
    </div></div>

    there are without doubt, congruent themes and ideas. two monks, thomas merton, a catholic trappist monk, and a vietnamese zen monk, risked expulsion and excommunication from their respective orders to explore their respective systems and their work was exemplary. the zen monk was Thich Nhat Han.

    where a ch'an buddhist would differ from a christian would basically be in regards to attempts to establish yashua's divinity- buddhism wouldn't care- and in general the sacrificial salvation plan for humanity's sins. Ch'an is based on too logical a system to deal with the inconsistencies presented, but maybe other sects would have less problems.

    I think also that to many buddhists, at least the ones who I have dealt with, once they have read the gospels they mostly grow puzzled when looking at the texts and then looking at the people, because to them the teachings are quite clear and they often are left scratching their heads.

    I am reminded of a ch'an story about a novice monk named Yashida, the rumor or story has it that he was a seminary student.

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">A student once visited the Zen master Gasan in Tenryuji, one of the five great Zen monasteries in Kyoto, and asked him: "Have you ever read the Christian Bible?" Gasan replied: "No--read it for me."

    The student opened the Bible and began to read from the Gospel of Matthew: "And why do you worry about clothing? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they neither toil nor spin, yet I tell you, even Solomon in all his glory was not clothed like one of them. . . . So do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will bring worries of its own" (6:28ff.).

    Gasan said: "I would say that the man who spoke these words is enlightened."

    The student continued his reading: "Ask, and it will be given you; search, and you will find; knock, and the door will be opened for you" (7:7).

    Gasan then said: "Wonderful! The man who spoke such words is not far from Buddhahood!"</div></div>

    Concordantly there is a stream of contemplative Christianity of which many christians are woefully unaware. Yashua himself was clearly a mendicant renunciate, and this would resonate deeply with any student of Buddhist lineage. I would say Yashua and his disciples were unequivocably congruent to Gotama. Applying the ch'an dialectic reveals a lot of the transcendental aspects of Yashua's teachings.

    Like Buddhism, indeed, like all spiritual systems, what is at work is a struggle to reconcile with the universe and become one again. You see, if you accept the idea that there is a God and he is omniscient and omnipotent, then there is no logical way to accept original sin, heaven or hell. From this simple rejection, it becomes readily apparent then to look at the gospels and yashua's teachings in quite a different light. This also makes sense because Yashua himself never speaks about the redemption of original sin or restoring Adam from the fall. I mean, this is glaringly obvious and i think any reasonable person would have to wonder why, if this is the purpose of his ministry and mission, why is he so silent about it when he on several occasions is presented with the perfect opportunity to lay it out, he instead says love god, love thy neighbor, sell all that thou hast, and give to the poor. Then you will have Heaven. Also he mentions and uses people who have already gotten into heaven so there is no need for his sacrifice to get people there...and he repeatedly tells people they are saved before his own sacrifice, free from sin, and to sin no more. I don't think it is fair to label him inconsistent of his own accord.

    Where Buddhism and Christianity shine together would be in Yashua's methodically gorgeous transcendental instructions- the kingdom is at hand, within, the mustard seed, compassion, most of the parables, unity with the Father/Universe, etc.

    So to Buddhism, divinity salvation would be weird, and to Christians reincarnation, the law of karma, no need for a God/saviour to convey unity, that would probably be a little weird.

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">
    Statues of religious nature generally assumes worship, so this is good to note also.
    </div></div>

    yeah, in a sense it reminded me a lot of catholics because they love their statuary and often lay practitioners probably get a little confused about using the imagery as a focal point of their prayer.
    a noble stroke he lifted high that hung not but swift with tempest fell On Satan's proud crest- no sight nor swift thought, less could his shield such ruin intercept; 10 paces huge he back recoil'd...

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •