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  1. #11
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    Paul Bogle’s Morant Bay Uprising (Morant Bay, St. Thomas, Jamaica)

    As conditions for Black people became unbearable in Jamaica, Paul Bogle, the leader of the 1865 Morant Bay Uprising, started an initiative to fight the white colonial British government for justice and fair treatment.

    The seeds for the Morant Bay Uprising were sown on Oct. 7, 1865, when Bogle and his supporters attended a trial for a Black man who was imprisoned for trespassing on a long-abandoned plantation. At the court, one member of Bogle’s group protested the unjust trial and he was immediately arrested, angering the crowd further. He was rescued moments later, when Bogle and his men took to the market square and retaliated, severely beating the police and forcing them to retreat.

    Two days later, warrants were issued against Bogle and a number of his men for rioting and assault. The police arrived at Bogle’s community to arrest them, but were met with stiff resistance from the men and again, the police were forced to retreat to Morant Bay.

    On Oct. 11, Bogle and his followers decided not to wait for the police to return but armed themselves and went to the Court House in Morant Bay. The authorities were shaken, and fired into the crowd, killing seven people. Bogle and his men retaliated, by setting fire to the Court House and nearby buildings. As several white officials and militia tried to leave the burning buildings, Bogle and his followers killed them and took control of the town. In the days that followed as many as 2,000 of Bogle’s men roamed the countryside, killing white farm owners and forcing others to flee for their lives.
    I have no desire to take all black people back to Africa; there are blacks who are no good here and will likewise be no good there.
    Marcus Garvey

    satire protected speech soo more fiyah

  2. #12
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    The Malagasy Uprising (Madagascar)

    The Malagasy Uprising was a Black nationalist revolt against French colonial rule in Madagascar, lasting from March 1947 to December 1948.

    In late 1945, Black Malagasy nationalists, Joseph Raseta, Joseph Ravoahangy and Jacques Rabemananjara of the Mouvement Démocratique de la Rénovation Malgache (MDRM) political party, led a drive to achieve independence for Madagascar through legal channels. The failure of this initiative and the harsh response it drew from the Socialist administration of French Prime Minister Paul Ramadier, radicalized elements of the Black population, including leaders of several militant nationalist secret societies.

    On the evening of March 29, 1947, coordinated surprise attacks were launched by the nationalists against military bases and French-owned plantations in the eastern region of the island. The nationalist cause was rapidly adopted in the south and spread to the central highlands and the capital of Antananarivo by the following month, with the number of Black nationalist fighters estimated at over 1 million.

    The Black Malagasy nationalists attacked several other French-owned army bases, businesses, and farms until they eventually slaughtered approximately 2,450 French nationals, and other supporters of PADESM, a pro-France Malagasy political party created with support from the colonial authorities to compete with MDRM. The results of the Malagasy Uprising worried the French authorities, ultimately forcing them to declare Madagascar’s independence in 1960.
    I have no desire to take all black people back to Africa; there are blacks who are no good here and will likewise be no good there.
    Marcus Garvey

    satire protected speech soo more fiyah

  3. #13
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    The Marlborough Ship Massacre
    In 1752, the English ship “Marlborough” that was owned by William Lougher & Co. of Bristol, and captained by Robert Codd, left England for Bonny, Nigeria and the Gold Coast (modern-day Ghana) of West Africa. It was its fourth and final voyage to transport captured Africans to slavery in the Americas.

    The crew made it to West Africa, 420 African captives were purchased, and the ship set out across the Atlantic Ocean to sail to the Americas.

    The captain attempted to use 28 of the Africans from the Gold Coast to help sail the ship and on Oct. 14, 1752, three days after leaving Bonny, the ship was taken over by the captives on board. They led the successful uprising when they were brought up on deck for washing. The 420 Black men and women fought and killed 33 of the 35 crewmen on board. They kept two crew members alive to sail the ship back to West Africa. The ship sailed to Bonny first and the Africans from that region went ashore. The remaining men and women set off for the Gold Coast and upon reaching there, the ship and the two remaining crew members were never seen again.
    I have no desire to take all black people back to Africa; there are blacks who are no good here and will likewise be no good there.
    Marcus Garvey

    satire protected speech soo more fiyah

  4. #14
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    Black Celebs Who Risked Fame & Fortune To Move Us Forward

    Muhammad Ali

    Former professional boxer Muhammad Ali is generally considered among the greatest heavyweights in the sport’s history. A controversial and even polarizing figure during his early career, Ali is today widely regarded not only for the skills he displayed in the ring but for the values he exemplified outside of it: religious freedom, racial justice and the triumph of principle over expedience.

    When Ali appeared on the scene, it was popular among those in the vanguard of the civil rights movement to take the “safe” path. That path was unsafe for those who participated in the struggle. Too many men and women were subjected to economic assaults, violence and death when they carried the struggle “too far.”

    Then along came Ali, preaching not “white American values,” but freedom and equality of a kind rarely seen anywhere in the world. And as if that wasn’t threatening enough, Ali attacked the status quo from outside of politics and the accepted strategies of the civil rights movement.

    source: .gilderlehrman.org
    I have no desire to take all black people back to Africa; there are blacks who are no good here and will likewise be no good there.
    Marcus Garvey

    satire protected speech soo more fiyah

  5. #15
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    Black Celebs Who Risked Fame & Fortune To Move Us Forward

    Bob Marley

    Bob Marley was a Jamaican singer-songwriter who achieved international fame through a series of crossover reggae albums. He’s considered to be one of the greatest and most influential artists of all time. Marley is often credited with making the Rastafarian way of life popular around the world, and he was passionate about the rights of African people across the Diaspora.

    His accomplishments are too many to list here. However, his music can be thought of as the soundtrack to many independent struggles in Africa.

    Always trying to broker peace, Marley almost paid with his life in December 1976, when he was scheduled to perform at a concert aimed at ending political violence in Jamaica. Two days before the event, gunmen opened fire on his Kingston home attempting to kill him before he could perform. Miraculously, Bob and the rest of the band escaped with their lives intact.

    In recognition of his courageous attempt to bridge Jamaica’s cavernous political divide, Marley traveled to the United Nations in New York where he received the Peace Medal of the Third World in June 1978.

    source: bobmarley.com
    I have no desire to take all black people back to Africa; there are blacks who are no good here and will likewise be no good there.
    Marcus Garvey

    satire protected speech soo more fiyah

  6. #16
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    Black Celebs Who Risked Fame & Fortune To Move Us Forward



    Jackie Robinson

    Born Jan. 31, 1919, in Cairo, Ga., Jackie Robinson was the first African-American to play major league baseball.

    As an exceptional baseball player, Robinson faced blatant racial discrimination during his career, but he did not let it deter him from integrating the league.

    Robinson also became a vocal champion for African-American athletes, the civil rights movement and other social and political causes. In July 1949, he testified on discrimination before the House Un-American Activities Committee. In 1952, he publicly called out the Yankees as a racist organization for not having broken the color barrier five years after he began playing with the Dodgers.

    source: biography.com
    I have no desire to take all black people back to Africa; there are blacks who are no good here and will likewise be no good there.
    Marcus Garvey

    satire protected speech soo more fiyah

  7. #17
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    Black Celebs Who Risked Fame & Fortune To Move Us Forward


    Harry Belafonte

    A multi-talented performer, Harry Belafonte was born on March 1, 1927, in New York City to Caribbean parents. He was dubbed the “King of Calypso” for popularizing the Caribbean musical style with an international audience in the 1950s. Belafonte is perhaps best known for singing, “Day-O (The Banana Boat Song)” with its signature lyrics. He is also known for starring in major films.

    Belafonte supported the civil rights movement in the 1950s and was one of Martin Luther King Jr.’s confidants. Like many other civil rights activists, he was blacklisted during the McCarthy era.

    Throughout his career, Belafonte has been vocal in pushing our people’s rights forward. Even to this day, he has been critical of the last two administrations and the lack of activism by current celebrities. He is also actively protesting the “Stand Your Ground” laws in the name of the slain Florida teenager Trayvon Martin.

    source: wikipedia.com
    I have no desire to take all black people back to Africa; there are blacks who are no good here and will likewise be no good there.
    Marcus Garvey

    satire protected speech soo more fiyah

  8. #18
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    Black Celebs Who Risked Fame & Fortune To Move Us Forward

    Bill Russell

    The Hall Of Fame basketball player is known as one of the greatest winners of all time, victorious in 11 NBA championships. However, even though he was one of the greatest players to ever play, Russell faced intense discrimination while playing in Boston.

    For our people, Russell’s role off the basketball court was equally important as it was on it. Russell has been a consistent advocate of equality. As a highly visible public figure in the years when the country was emerging from a century of legally sanctioned discrimination, Russell threw his prestige behind the dawning civil rights movement, participating with Martin Luther King Jr. During the historic 1963 March on Washington, Russell sat in the front row to hear King’s inspiring “I Have a Dream” speech.

    Russell was a prominent voice among athletes during the civil rights era and he paved the way for many black athletes to play without fear or discrimination.

    source: hoop-nation.com
    I have no desire to take all black people back to Africa; there are blacks who are no good here and will likewise be no good there.
    Marcus Garvey

    satire protected speech soo more fiyah

  9. #19
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    Black Celebs Who Risked Fame & Fortune To Move Us Forward

    Sidney Poitier

    More than an actor and Academy-Award winner, Sidney Poitier is an artist. A writer and director, a thinker and critic, a humanitarian and diplomat, his stature as a cultural icon was built on his stance against human suffering.

    Throughout the 1950s, the Bahamian entertainer starred in important and controversial movies. Addressing issues of racial equality abroad, he made “Cry, The Beloved Country” about apartheid in South Africa and “To Sir, With Love,” about social and racial issues in London. He later took on problems closer to home in “Blackboard Jungle” and especially, “The Defiant Ones,” about two escaped prisoners who must overcome issues of race in their struggle for freedom.

    For his role in “The Defiant Ones,” Poitier was nominated for an Academy Award.

    Source: pbs.org
    I have no desire to take all black people back to Africa; there are blacks who are no good here and will likewise be no good there.
    Marcus Garvey

    satire protected speech soo more fiyah

  10. #20
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    Black Celebs Who Risked Fame & Fortune To Move Us Forward


    Josephine Baker

    Baker was the first African-American female to star in a major motion picture, Zouzou (1934), to integrate an American concert hall, and to become a world-famous entertainer.

    Baker refused to perform for segregated audiences in the United States, and her insistence on mixed audiences helped to integrate shows in certain parts of the country. Baker also worked with the NAACP and in 1963, she spoke at the March on Washington at the side of Martin Luther King Jr. Baker was the only official female speaker and she introduced the “Negro Women for Civil Rights.”

    source: wikipedia.com
    I have no desire to take all black people back to Africa; there are blacks who are no good here and will likewise be no good there.
    Marcus Garvey

    satire protected speech soo more fiyah

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