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evanovitch
11-07-2009, 09:34 PM
Saturday, 07 November 2009
There is a further call Dr. Omar Davies, Opposition Spokesman on Finance to be removed as Chairman the Public Accounts Committee (PAC).

The National Democratic Movement (NDM) has joined the Jamaica Labour Party's youth arm G2K in urging Dr. Davies to recuse himself from the Committee.

In a statement, the NDM said the former Finance Minister is no longer suitable to hold the post following recent revelations.

It cited Dr. Davies' handling of the employment contract for former Bank of Jamaica Governor Derick Latibeaudiere.

Michael Williams, NDM General Secretary, says other issues have brought Dr. Davies' tenure as PAC Chairman into question.

"That has been the significant factor that has plagued Dr. Davies' administration ever since and now with the recent revelations of the forward selling of bauxite and what happened the FINSAC deal. There's also the incident that the Contractor General (CG) has commented on, him giving false information to the CG which is a breach and demonstrates a certain amount of dishonesty," he said.

evanovitch
11-08-2009, 02:47 AM
Love him, hate him ...
Published: Sunday | November 8, 2009




FOR FOURTEEN years, Dr Omar Davies controlled the country's purse strings with a swagger that made people love him or hate him; but revelations over the past two months have led to a dramatic rise in the latter group.

After a contrived by-election in which he was elected member of parliament for the People's National Party's (PNP) safe seat of South St Andrew, Davies was ushered into the Ministry of Finance in December 1993 to replace Hugh Small.

From day one, Davies commanded the country's financial operations with a confidence that many of his detractors labelled arrogance.

That confidence, or arrogance, was based on a solid academic foundation. He is a graduate of the University of the West Indies and Northwestern University in the United States. He received a doctorate in economics at the latter. The former finance minister was also an assistant professor at the ivy-league institution, Stanford University, in California.

older posts

In addition, Davies served as a senior lecturer in the Department of Economics at the University of the West Indies, and was director general of the Planning Institute of Jamaica.

Throughout his tenure as finance minister, Davies attracted an almost equal number of admirers and detractors.

However, even his staunch critics struggled to challenge claims that he was a man of integrity after he avoided the many allegations of corruption that were levelled at other members of the PNP over the 18 years that it held on to state power.

While some detractors labelled his handling of the country's finances as incompetent, they could only point to his now infamous "run wid it" speech when they wanted to question his integrity.

clear danger signs

That speech came in the aftermath of the 2002 general election when Davies implied that despite clear danger signs, some government spending had been done with an eye on another electoral victory for the PNP.

But in recent weeks, some of the luster has started to leave the man who earned the confidence, if not admiration, of many in the financial sector locally and internationally.

First came the contractor general's claim that "Dr Davies had unlawfully and improperly intervened in the sale of the London Heathrow slots, and that the process of evaluation, selection and approval of the Virgin Atlantic proposal lacked merit, transparency, fairness and impartiality".

It was further claimed that "Davies made a false statement to mislead, or attempted to mislead a contractor general, contrary to Section 29 (a) of the Contractor General Act".

That fire blazed hotter for Davies when the director of public prosecutions agreed with the findings of the contractor general and sent the matter to the police for further investigation.

Davies has argued that any incorrect statement he made to the contractor general would be a genuine mistake as his files had been left at his former office and he was going from memory.

multimillion-dollar contract

And even as the public digested that development, Davies again found himself in the spotlight last week when Prime Minister Bruce Golding told the country about the multimillion-dollar contract given to former central bank Governor Derick Latibeaudiere.

"It was a strange contract, the likes of which has not up to now been found anywhere else," Golding declared while pointing to the contract that had been signed by Davies.

"The former governor is not to be blamed for the absurdly generous and open-ended contractual terms that he enjoyed. He was the beneficiary. That blame must be laid squarely at the feet of the former government and the former minister of finance, in particular, who authorised and signed the contract," added Golding as he claimed that it was significant that there was no record that the contract had been approved by the Cabinet.

In his defence, Davies accepted that while the contract might have been excessive, it was standard, and so had not needed the approval of the Cabinet.

Davies has also received public backing from his party, which claimed the former finance minister did no wrong.

But this has not stopped the scathing criticisms, and Dr Omar Davies is now among The Sunday Gleaner's People Under Pressure.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The National Democratic Movement (NDM) and the Jamaica Labour Party's young professionals group, Generation 2000 (G2K), have turned up the heat on Opposition Spokesman on Finance Dr Omar Davies.

The NDM has called on Opposition Leader Portia Simpson Miller to remove Davies as the party's spokesman on finance and as the chairman of the Public Accounts Committee (PAC).

According to the NDM, Davies should not remain in politics based on several issues, including his incompetence.

In the meantime, G2K argues that Davies' judgement, competence and stewardship as a public official have been called into question once again.

"It is most unfortunate that an individual who had repeatedly demonstrated reckless behaviour as finance minister could be vested with the awesome responsibility of presiding over a committee as sensitive as the PAC in the first place," charged G2K.

Dr.Dudd
11-08-2009, 11:59 AM
the media at it's usual decoy when things are going down.

while the IMF is setting up the country for it's near demise.

they are distracting the people with nonsense.
The governor was too sharp for the negotiators to pull the wool over his eyes.
So they use the media to disparage him and force him to resign.
Now they are free to take the country to the cleaners.

why is it thet the policies used in developed countries are the opposite used in third world countries?
And economic turn around is always successsful in developed countries, but never once in third world countries??

Dyoll_73
11-08-2009, 01:32 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Dr.Dudd</div><div class="ubbcode-body">the media at it's usual decoy when things are going down.

while the IMF is setting up the country for it's near demise.

they are distracting the people with nonsense.
The governor was too sharp for the negotiators to pull the wool over his eyes.
So they use the media to disparage him and force him to resign.
Now they are free to take the country to the cleaners.

why is it thet the policies used in developed countries are the opposite used in third world countries?
And economic turn around is always successsful in developed countries, but never once in third world countries?? </div></div>

It's funny how I never heard you decry the PNP's PR machinery in the media prior to September 2007, but here you are ...

When you say the governor is &quot;too sharp&quot; you should explain what you mean. In any case, he has been a part of Jamaica's problems, and thus, his removal is part of the solution.

Dr.Dudd
11-08-2009, 01:51 PM
Lets say you have not been here long enough.<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Humano</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Dr.Dudd</div><div class="ubbcode-body">the media at it's usual decoy when things are going down.

while the IMF is setting up the country for it's near demise.

they are distracting the people with nonsense.
The governor was too sharp for the negotiators to pull the wool over his eyes.
So they use the media to disparage him and force him to resign.
Now they are free to take the country to the cleaners.

why is it thet the policies used in developed countries are the opposite used in third world countries?
And economic turn around is always successsful in developed countries, but never once in third world countries?? </div></div>

It's funny how I never heard you decry the PNP's PR machinery in the media prior to September 2007, but here you are ...

When you say the governor is &quot;too sharp&quot; you should explain what you mean. In any case, he has been a part of Jamaica's problems, and thus, his removal is part of the solution. </div></div>

Dyoll_73
11-08-2009, 02:11 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Dr.Dudd</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Lets say you have not been here long enough.</div></div>

Believe it or not, I've been here longer than you have; I first registered in August 2000, and except for a period of absence for about two years, I've been writing and observing on this board.

Dr.Dudd
11-08-2009, 02:22 PM
Well if you have been here longer than this board exist you can say that. don't believe everything you read. The registration dates have been messed I have her from the days of the one page. and have been here continuously since. <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Humano</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Dr.Dudd</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Lets say you have not been here long enough.</div></div>

Believe it or not, I've been here longer than you have; I first registered in August 2000, and except for a period of absence for about two years, I've been writing and observing on this board. </div></div>

Dr.Dudd
11-08-2009, 02:25 PM
If you were reading since then, you probably conveniently forget,my criticism of the PNP when they were in power.

evanovitch
11-08-2009, 05:06 PM
ovah in di post whe mi ha bout him firing..u wi see picture of his house n him talk bout him farm too...

news about his high life an spending is not news..but unda di 18yrs all went on cause who was gwine to fyah him..him fren whe gi him di job

like mi seh, mi cannot believe dat the people who maligned the 21 families bk in di days live fi come try outdo dem n all wile singing betta muss come..dem shudda qualify dat di betta was gwine to come to juss dem

Dr.Dudd
11-08-2009, 05:59 PM
there is a lot of Jamaicans who own race horses.
He owned horses before he got the job.
As a matter of example my family own race horses.
you really don't have to be super wealthy to own lots of horses if you have a farm.
For one <span style="font-size: 11pt">every dime spent on a horse farm is tax deductible under the Jamaican tax laws.
Most Jamaican wealthy at least own a share in some tax shelter.
race horses is the tax shelter of the unsophisticated.
You can win tax free money and all your expenses are tax deductible.
</span> <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: evanovich</div><div class="ubbcode-body">ovah india post whe mi ha bout him firing..uwi see picture of his house n him talk bout him farm too...

news about his high life an spending is not news..but da da 18yrs all went on cause who was gwine to fyah him..him from whe gi him da job

like mi seh, mi cannot believe dat the people who maligned the 21 families bk in da days live fi come try outdo demon all wile singing betta muss come..dem shoulda qualify dat da betta was gwine to come to juss dem </div></div>

evanovitch
11-08-2009, 06:41 PM
mi ongle a go laff cause mi know u lass name not Feanny...nuff said http://www.jamaicans.com/forums/images/smilies/rolleyes.gif as to di ress http://www.jamaicans.com/forums/images/smilies/rolleyes.gif http://www.jamaicans.com/forums/images/smilies/70374-lipsrsealed.gif

Dr.Dudd
11-08-2009, 06:53 PM
Wrongggg ''bait. http://www.jamaicans.com/forums/images/smilies/desdentado.gif

RichD
11-09-2009, 10:20 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Dr.Dudd</div><div class="ubbcode-body">there is a lot of Jamaicans who own race horses.
He owned horses before he got the job.
As a matter of example my family own race horses.
you really don't have to be super wealthy to own lots of horses if you have a farm.
For one <span style="font-size: 11pt">every dime spent on a horse farm is tax deductible under the Jamaican tax laws.
Most Jamaican wealthy at least own a share in some tax shelter.
race horses is the tax shelter of the unsophisticated.
You can win tax free money and all your expenses are tax deductible.
</span> <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: evanovich</div><div class="ubbcode-body">ovah india post whe mi ha bout him firing..uwi see picture of his house n him talk bout him farm too...

news about his high life an spending is not news..but da da 18yrs all went on cause who was gwine to fyah him..him from whe gi him da job

like mi seh, mi cannot believe dat the people who maligned the 21 families bk in da days live fi come try outdo demon all wile singing betta muss come..dem shoulda qualify dat da betta was gwine to come to juss dem </div></div> </div></div>

why dem need tax shelter when moassa dem not paying tax?http://www.jamaicans.com/forums/images/smilies/70402-thinking.gif

Dr.Dudd
11-09-2009, 11:35 AM
That is how many of them avoid paying taxwes.<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: RichD</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Dr.Dudd</div><div class="ubbcode-body">there is a lot of Jamaicans who own race horses.
He owned horses before he got the job.
As a matter of example my family own race horses.
you really don't have to be super wealthy to own lots of horses if you have a farm.
For one <span style="font-size: 11pt">every dime spent on a horse farm is tax deductible under the Jamaican tax laws.
Most Jamaican wealthy at least own a share in some tax shelter.
race horses is the tax shelter of the unsophisticated.
You can win tax free money and all your expenses are tax deductible.
</span> <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: evanovich</div><div class="ubbcode-body">ovah india post whe mi ha bout him firing..uwi see picture of his house n him talk bout him farm too...

news about his high life an spending is not news..but da da 18yrs all went on cause who was gwine to fyah him..him from whe gi him da job

like mi seh, mi cannot believe dat the people who maligned the 21 families bk in da days live fi come try outdo demon all wile singing betta muss come..dem shoulda qualify dat da betta was gwine to come to juss dem </div></div> </div></div>

why dem need tax shelter when moassa dem not paying tax?http://www.jamaicans.com/forums/images/smilies/70402-thinking.gif </div></div>

RichD
11-09-2009, 11:41 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Dr.Dudd</div><div class="ubbcode-body">That is how many of them avoid paying taxwes.<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: RichD</div><div class="ubbcode-body">

why dem need tax shelter when moassa dem not paying tax?http://www.jamaicans.com/forums/images/smilies/70402-thinking.gif </div></div> </div></div>



so doc how does this reconcile with recent disclosure that outside of PAYE filers there were only something like 5000 persons on the tax roles..seems to me that the majority of them just dont file.

Dr.Dudd
11-09-2009, 12:48 PM
Because you have to make tax returns to get tax exempt.
So all the race horse owners farmers and shareholders will make their tax returns.
It does not mean they pay much.

IT only mean they make returns
i would wager that of those 5000, are the shop owners, They are usually very astute on their tax return.
on making returns.
don't know about paying their fair tax rate.
the professionals who work in the informal areas in addition to their government jobs are usually ,........
just say forget to pay or make return on that amount outside of the government net. quote=RichD]<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Dr.Dudd</div><div class="ubbcode-body">That is how many of them avoid paying taxwes.<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: RichD</div><div class="ubbcode-body">

why dem need tax shelter when moassa dem not paying tax?http://www.jamaicans.com/forums/images/smilies/70402-thinking.gif </div></div> </div></div>



so doc how does this reconcile with recent disclosure that outside of PAYE filers there were only something like 5000 persons on the tax roles..seems to me that the majority of them just dont file. [/quote]

evanovitch
11-09-2009, 02:02 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Dr.Dudd</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Wrongggg ''bait. http://www.jamaicans.com/forums/images/smilies/desdentado.gif </div></div>

mi no bait..if mi did interested mi would find out...but mi not but mi know seh u is NOT of the family mi name...dats all

evanovitch
11-15-2009, 08:41 PM
The strange silence of Omar Davies

Lately it is becoming fashionable to conclude that reports of the death of the NDM have been highly exaggerated.

I have no evidence that its support among the electorate is even 10 per cent but, as a pressure group, it has its use.

Recently, it produced a press release which to me represented in a concise form the best presentation of the omissions and co-missions of former PNP Finance Minister Omar Davies that I have seen so far. With this being PNP country, it is never in vogue to attempt a rehashing of the sins of the former administration.

Some take the view that we live in the present, therefore, 100 per cent of the past must be left in the past 100 per cent of the time. When that is coupled with the toddler-like approach of the present administration, it brings more fuel to the fire of those who support the view that we should look ahead.

According to the NDM release, it would like PNP leader Portia Simpson Miller to remove the South St Andrew MP as opposition spokesman on finance and as chairman of the Public Accounts Committee. The NDM cites the following as reasons:

&quot;Incompetence: in the handling of the employment contract for former Governor Derick Latibeaudiere and for not informing the Cabinet, Parliament and the people about the details in the open-ended contract.&quot;

This charge seems incontrovertible. While there is no sniff of corruption, for a man like Omar Davies who has always prided himself on his technical abilities and attention to detail, it is scandalous in the least that he could have allowed such an open-ended employment contract for the former BOJ head to the extent that he was allowed a $51-million loan at five per cent without Board approval.

&quot;Dishonesty: As reported by the contractor general, for not being truthful and honest to the Office of the Contractor General in a sworn affidavit on matters concerning the sale of an Air Jamaica slot to Virgin Atlantic.&quot;

The Office of the Contractor General is one of those bright lights still burning in Jamaica. It is a first-world operation staffed with bright, dedicated people whose only responsibility seems to be to get the job done without favour to any political stripe. Dr Omar Davies has many holes to fill in some of the explanations given. The revelations, as anyone can read on their website, are demanding of the proper answers.

&quot;Irresponsibility: For approving the forward sale of bauxite which is now costing the people of Jamaica vast sums of money which we cannot afford.&quot;

It was, after all, not Dr Davies' personal bauxite so, with his party out of power, to hell with those who must deal with it now.

&quot;Recklessness: In approving approximately $14 billion in the &quot;run with it&quot; expenditure, causing massive inflation and overspending by government which further increased interest rates.&quot;

After the 2002 election, the finance minister was speaking to 'comrades' (in 2003) at a gathering. It was there that he let it slip that in the months leading up the election his government went on a spending spree to enhance its chances at victory. He was honest, but for a man who was the finance boss, he should have been summarily fired.

&quot;Unpatriotic Action: For presiding over a high interest rate policy, resulting in the strangulation and closure of numerous banks and businesses and the selling of people's homes; the formation of FINSAC and the selling off of Jamaican people's assets to a foreign entity for 30 cents in the dollar.&quot;

It is in this area that I believe the nation must be fully informed of what took place during those years. Not only were people's lives destroyed, but it also set back the efforts of local investors who saw the ease with which the former finance minister, with the stroke of a pen, wiped out the hope and literally killed off the black entrepreneurial class.

To date he is convinced his moves were prudent and he remains unapologetic. I believe Dr Omar Davies should do the decent thing and resign his posts or be forcefully removed.

[email protected]

evanovitch
11-22-2009, 02:00 AM
'Omar, we want answers'
Published: Sunday | November 22, 2009



Aldrane E Genius, Contributor

Davies - File

IN AN address to Parliament on November 3 on the dismissal of then Bank of Jamaica's (BOJ) governor Derick Latibeaudiere and the resignation of Commissioner of Police Hardley Lewin, Prime Minister Bruce Golding, referring to the overly generous contract that was awarded to Mr Latibeaudiere, stated: &quot;The former governor is not to be blamed for the absurdly generous and open-ended con-tractual terms that he enjoyed. He was the beneficiary. That blame must be laid squarely at the feet of the former government and the former minister of finance, in particular, who authorised and signed the contract.&quot;

Some might argue that the prime minister is being overly generous in his removal of blame from Mr Latibeaudiere, especially given the public perception that he refused to move into the residence provided for him by the central bank, opting instead to remain in his own house - a seemingly more expensive option. What is more, is the report that the former governor allegedly refused to have the terms of his contract renegotiated to reflect a more reasonable payment package.

Golding is correct

In hindsight, Mr Golding is correct not to blame the former governor for the contract he received.

After all, Mr Latibeaudiere did not hold a gun to the head of Dr Omar Davies and demand what was a $38 million contract as at September 2009. Indeed, it is the former government and its so-called world-class finance minister who are primarily to be blamed for that 'sweetheart' contract that was presented to Mr Latibeaudiere.

Although Mr Latibeaudiere, as far as I know, did not coerce Dr Davies into signing such a generous contractual agreement, the former BOJ governor's acceptance of some of the terms of the contract has been perceived by taxpayers as being unconscionable and unethical.

What makes the situation even more offensive to taxpayers is the notion that Mr Latibeaudiere allegedly refused a cost-cutting initiative in relation to his contractual terms, particularly in light of the harsh economic challenges that the country has been facing since the 1990s, and which have been made even worse as a result of the global economic crisis.

Ironically, public opinion is that Mr Latibeaudiere's monetary policies, as head of the central bank, have contributed significantly to the economic quandary in which we now find ourselves.

There is no doubt about the negative impact that the current economic crisis has had on the country. In effect, it has put a severe financial strain on the Government's ability to honour existing wage agreements and to finance much-needed capital-expenditure projects.

We are all aware of the Govern-ment's inability to pay the agreed seven per cent increase to public-sector workers and the difficulties being experienced in meeting the demand for the anticipated reclassification exercise for the island's nurses.

As a result of these harsh economic realities, the Government has made attempts to implement cost-cutting initiatives that will result in the reduction of public expenditure. The finance minister's alleged attempt, therefore, to renegotiate the housing provisions of Mr Latibeaudiere's contract, to arrive at a package that was more reasonable, can be interpreted as being something in the best interest of the country.

Cost-cutting initiatives of this nature are not new and are not confined to public-sector employees. The prime minister and other members of parliament (MPs) on the Government side, as well as the Speaker of the House, in a show of solidarity with the people of Jamaica, have all taken percentage reductions in their salaries.

Recently, the Ministry of Health entered into a two-year contract with telecoms provider Digicel for the provision of mobile and fixed-line services, which will cost the Government approximately J$10 million less than the former fragmented system that was being utilised.

Dr Davies' column

Another pill that the public has been finding hard to swallow is Dr Davies' column, published in The Sunday Gleaner on November 15. His report that Mr Latibeaudiere had confirmed his willingness to negotiate a mutually acceptable figure seems to conflict with statements made in Parliament by the prime minister.

The public is in desperate need of clarification on this matter and is deserving of such. Did the former governor of the BOJ refuse to have some aspects of his contract renegotiated? And if so, what is Dr Davies alluding to in his column?

I strongly urge Mr Latibeaudiere to provide us with some explanation on the matter, as I don't think Dr Davies is doing a good job!

Aldrane E. Genius is a member of Generation 2000 (G2k) Email: [email protected]