Boardite Group" /> Boardite Group RSS Feed" href="http://www.jamaicans.com/forums/external.php?type=RSS2" /> Boardite Group - Serious Discussions - Mek wi Reason - RSS Feed" href="http://www.jamaicans.com/forums/external.php?type=RSS2&forumids=17" /> black historee month - Page 11
  • Login:
- Powered by vBulletin" />

Welcome to the Community Forum. For boardites on facebook join our Boardite Group.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.

Page 11 of 38 FirstFirst ... 91011121321 ... LastLast
Results 101 to 110 of 372
  1. #101
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    17,760
    Quote Originally Posted by blugiant View Post
    Akhenaton

    Amenhotep IV, better known as “Akhenaton” is in some respects the most remarkable of the pharaohs.

    Akhenaton is considered the founder of the first monotheistic religion. He ruled from approximately 1352 – 1336 B.C., coming into power after his father, Amenhotep III, died. Akhenaton’s reign left a profound effect on Egypt and the entire world of his day. Thirteen hundred years before Christ, he preached and lived the gospel of perfect love, brotherhood, and truth. Two thousand years before Muhammed, he taught the doctrine of the “one God.” Three thousand years before Darwin, he sensed the unity that runs through all living things.

    The account of Akhenaton is not complete without the story of his beautiful wife, Nefertiti. What is known is that the relationship between Akhenaton and Nefertiti was one of history’s first well-known love stories.

    At the prompting of Akhenaton and Nefertiti, sculptors and artists began to recreate life in its natural state, instead of the rigid and lifeless forms of early Egyptian art.

    have you ever seen someone like akhenaten discussed in any of these "black history month" specials or discussions in the media?
    because i have not...they should just call it nee-gro his-story month;
    because it keeps the people's minds focused on slavery and its aftermath...that is all they ever discuss;
    mental slavery ting a gwaan

  2. #102
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    40/74
    Posts
    40,998
    Quote Originally Posted by jah_yout View Post
    have you ever seen someone like akhenaten discussed in any of these "black history month" specials or discussions in the media?
    because i have not...they should just call it nee-gro his-story month;
    because it keeps the people's minds focused on slavery and its aftermath...that is all they ever discuss;
    mental slavery ting a gwaan

    because black history month in many countries always start with slavery
    If you don't fight for what you deserve, you deserve what you get.
    We are > Fossil Fuels --- Bill McKibben 350.org

  3. #103
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    17,760
    Quote Originally Posted by kia027 View Post
    because black history month in many countries always start with slavery

    exactly---they subliminally drive it into your head that black=slavery...

    i consider "black history month" an enemy of the african peoples at this point...

    i've even seen the absurdity of jamaica celebrating it...pure comedy

  4. #104
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    35,229
    Quote Originally Posted by jah_yout View Post
    have you ever seen someone like akhenaten discussed in any of these "black history month" specials or discussions in the media?
    because i have not...they should just call it nee-gro his-story month;
    because it keeps the people's minds focused on slavery and its aftermath...that is all they ever discuss;
    mental slavery ting a gwaan
    dread didd yuh read bout da afrikkan woo was richer dan solomon

    da qwestian iss oww yuh view slavery?

    look att awl dem didd to da slaves ann da slaves neva give upp ann keep rising

    slaveree iss proof dat blakk peeps can ovacum anneeting
    I have no desire to take all black people back to Africa; there are blacks who are no good here and will likewise be no good there.
    Marcus Garvey

    satire protected speech soo more fiyah

  5. #105
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    35,229
    Mansa Musa I of Mali – the richest human being in all history.



    When we think of the world’s all-time richest people, names like Bill Gates, Warren Buffet and John D Rockefeller immediately come to mind.

    But few would have thought, or even heard of, Mansa Musa I of Mali – the obscure 14th century African king who was today named the richest person in all history.

    With an inflation adjusted fortune of $400 billion, Mansa Musa I would have been considerably richer than the world’s current richest man, Carlos Slim, who ranks in 22nd place with a relatively paltry $68 billion.


    Mansa Musa I ruled West Africa’s Malian Empire in the early 1300s, making his fortune by exploiting his country’s salt and gold production. Many mosques he built as a young man still stand today


    Here’s the full list of the ‘26 richest people of all time’:

    1. Mansa Musa I, (Ruler of Malian Empire, 1280-1331) $400 billion

    2. Rothschild Family (banking dynasty, 1740- ) $350 billion

    3. John D Rockefeller (industrialist, 1839-1937) $340 billion

    4. Andrew Carnegie (industrialist, 1835-1919) $310 billion

    5. Tsar Nicholas II of Russia (last Emperor of Russia, 1868-1918) $300 billion

    6. Osman Ali Khan, Asaf Jah VII (last ruler of Hyderabad, 1886-1967) $236 billion

    7. William the Conqueror (King of England, 1028-1087) $229.5 billion

    8. Muammar Gaddafi (former Libyan leader, 1942-2011) $200 billion

    9. Henry Ford (Ford Motor Company founder, 1863-1947) $199 billion

    10. Cornelius Vanderbilt (industrialist, 1794-1877) $185 billion

    11. Alan Rufus (Fighting companion of William the Conqueror, 1040-1093) $178.65 billion

    12. Bill Gates (Founder of Microsoft, 1955- ) $136 billion

    13. William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey (Norman nobleman, ??-1088) $146.13 billion

    14. John Jacob Astor (businessman, 1864-1912) $121 billion

    15. Richard Fitzalan, 10th Earl of Arundel (English nobleman, 1306-1376) £118.6 billion

    16. John of Gaunt (son of Edward III, 1330-1399) £110 billion

    17. Stephen Girard (shipping and banking mogul, 1750-1831) $105 billion

    18. Alexander Turney Stewart (entrepreneur, 1803-1876) $90 billion

    19. Henry, 1st Duke of Lancaster (English noble, 1310-1361) $85.1 billion

    20. Friedrich Weyerhaeuser (timber mogul, 1834-1914) $80 billion

    21. Jay Gould (railroad tycoon, 1836-1892) $71 billion

    22. Carlos Slim (business magnate, 1940- ) $68 billion

    23. Stephen Van Rensselaer (land owner, 1764- 1839) $68 billion

    24. Marshall Field (Marshall Field & Company founder, 1834-1906) $66 billion

    25. Sam Walton (Walmart founder, 1918-1992) $65billion

    26. Warren Buffett (investor, 1930- ) $64billion

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/wo...y-8213453.html
    I have no desire to take all black people back to Africa; there are blacks who are no good here and will likewise be no good there.
    Marcus Garvey

    satire protected speech soo more fiyah

  6. #106
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    17,760
    Quote Originally Posted by blugiant View Post
    dread didd yuh read bout da afrikkan woo was richer dan solomon

    da qwestian iss oww yuh view slavery?

    look att awl dem didd to da slaves ann da slaves neva give upp ann keep rising

    slaveree iss proof dat blakk peeps can ovacum anneeting

    this is true...
    but our history does not begin in slavery...slavery is a part, not the whole..

    to these modern-day nee-grows, their history begins in slavery...
    most "black history month" programs i see in the media or in schools only discuss post-slavery figures...never figures like akhenaten or mansa musa...
    subliminally that disconnects the youth from their ancient past...
    conditions them to view themselves only as a product of slavery---
    the present condition & extreme brainwash of black youth says "black history month" has not helped much

  7. #107
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    40/74
    Posts
    40,998
    Quote Originally Posted by blugiant View Post
    Mansa Musa I of Mali – the richest human being in all history.



    When we think of the world’s all-time richest people, names like Bill Gates, Warren Buffet and John D Rockefeller immediately come to mind.

    But few would have thought, or even heard of, Mansa Musa I of Mali – the obscure 14th century African king who was today named the richest person in all history.

    I am pleased to say in girlKia standard history book that I bought (2012 edition) Mansa Musa is in there - the history books are catching up as long as u noh buy the Texas edition
    If you don't fight for what you deserve, you deserve what you get.
    We are > Fossil Fuels --- Bill McKibben 350.org

  8. #108
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    35,229
    Quote Originally Posted by kia027 View Post
    I am pleased to say in girlKia standard history book that I bought (2012 edition) Mansa Musa is in there - the history books are catching up as long as u noh buy the Texas edition
    does itt awlso ave crispus attuck real name too
    I have no desire to take all black people back to Africa; there are blacks who are no good here and will likewise be no good there.
    Marcus Garvey

    satire protected speech soo more fiyah

  9. #109
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    35,229
    Quote Originally Posted by jah_yout View Post
    this is true...
    but our history does not begin in slavery...slavery is a part, not the whole..

    to these modern-day nee-grows, their history begins in slavery...
    most "black history month" programs i see in the media or in schools only discuss post-slavery figures...never figures like akhenaten or mansa musa...
    subliminally that disconnects the youth from their ancient past...
    conditions them to view themselves only as a product of slavery---
    the present condition & extreme brainwash of black youth says "black history month" has not helped much
    didd yuh see da addar tredd mii tarted bout wat da purpose aff blakk histaree month? slaveree iss a part aff owa histaree ann wii affii deal widd itt. sum aff da criticism aff blakk histaree month widd regard to slaveree iss fram blakk woo ar natt comfartable dealinn widd slaveree so dem tri fe ignore itt
    I have no desire to take all black people back to Africa; there are blacks who are no good here and will likewise be no good there.
    Marcus Garvey

    satire protected speech soo more fiyah

  10. #110
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    35,229
    Imhotep (2980 B.C.)

    Imhotep, called "God of Medicine," "Prince of Peace," and a "Type of Christ." Imhotep was worshipped as a god and healer from approximately 2850 B.C. to 525 B.C., and as a full deity from 525 B.C. to 550 A.D. Even kings and queens bowed at his throne. Imhotep lived during the Third Dynasty at the court of King Zoser. Imhotep was a known scribe, chief lector, priest, architect, astronomer and magician (medicine and magic were used together.) For 3000 years he was worshipped as a god in Greece and Rome. Early Christians worshipped him as the "Prince of Peace."

    Imhotep was also a poet and philosopher. He urged contentment and preached cheerfulness. His proverbs contained a "philosophy of life." Imhotep coined the saying "Eat, drink and be merry for tomorrow we shall die."

    When the Egyptians crossed the Mediterranean, becoming the foundation of the Greek culture, Imhotep's teachings were absorbed there. Yet, as the Greeks were determined to assert that they were the originators of everything, Imhotep was forgotten for thousands of years and a legendary figure, Hippocrates, who came 2000 years after him became known as the Father of Medicine.

    It is Imhotep says Sir William Osler, who was the real Father of Medicine. "The first figure of a physician to stand out clearly from the mists of antiquity." Imhotep diagnosed and treated over 200 diseases, 15 diseases of the abdomen, 11 of the bladder, 10 of the rectum, 29 of the eyes, and 18 of the skin, hair, nails and tongue. Imhotep treated tuberculosis, gallstones, appendicitis, gout and arthritis. He also performed surgery and practiced some dentistry. Imhotep extracted medicine from plants. He also knew the position and function of the vital organs and circulation of the blood system. The Encyclopedia Britannica says, "The evidence afforded by Egyptian and Greek texts support the view that Imhotep's reputation was very respected in early times...His prestige increased with the lapse of centuries and his temples in Greek times were the centers of medical teachings."

    James Henry Breasted says of Imhotep: In priestly wisdom, in magic, in the formulation of wise proverbs; in medicine and architecture; this remarkable figure of Zoser's reign left so notable a reputation that his name was never forgotten. He was the patron spirit of the later scribes, to whom they regularly poured out a libation from the water-jug of their writing outfit before beginning their work. The people sang of his proverbs centuries later, and 2500 years after his death, he had become a god of medicine in whom Greeks, who call him Imouthes, recognized their own Asklepios. A temple was erected to him near the Serapeum at Memphis, and at the present day, every museum possesses a bronze statue or two of the apotheosized wise man, the proverb maker, physician, and architect of Zoser.
    I have no desire to take all black people back to Africa; there are blacks who are no good here and will likewise be no good there.
    Marcus Garvey

    satire protected speech soo more fiyah

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •